The official site of England’s Stove Works.

Notice

Please see the below information for the Smartstove pellet stove Notice:

Recall to Repair notice

Consumer letter

Video that details the repair

Registration Form - please complete this form for your repair kit. The kit and simple instructions will be mailed to your home, free of charge.

Any Questions: Please call (800) 641-3066

Recall Registration

Maintenance

Not sure if something is working properly? Select your stove model above and watch the video that applies to your maintenance needs.

Featured Pellet Stoves

Have a stove you're interested in? Scroll down to see which one you may want. Just browsing and not sure which is best for you? Click Here

25-PDV Pellet Stove

25-PDVC Pellet Stove

25-IP Pellet Stove

25-EP/EPI

25-PAH Pellet Stove

10-CPM Pellet Stove

All Videos

Featured Wood Stoves

Have a stove you're interested in? Scroll down to see which one you may want. Just browsing and not sure which is best for you? Click Here

17VL Series Wood Stove

13NC Series Wood Stove

13NCI Series Wood Stove

30NC Series Wood Stove

28-3500 Add on Wood Furnace

All Stoves

Will a wood or pellet stove save me money?

We've all heard  many of the great reasons for purchasing a wood (or wood pellet) stove...

Wood and Pellet Stoves Save Money

We've all heard  many of the great reasons for purchasing a wood (or wood pellet) stove.

       A few of the more popular reasons are:
       -It uses renewable fuel
       -The fuel is widely available
       -It makes you more self-reliable and independent from oil, electricity, etc.
       -The heat just feels "better" and the flame is cozy and beautiful to look at

      But the main thing on many people's minds who are considering the purchase of a wood, pellet or multi-fuel stove is:
    "Will a wood stove, multi-fuel or pellet stove save me money?"

Please take a few moments to look below at some of the resources we've gathered that address the advantages of heating with wood or wood pellet fuel.  They cover many of the great perks of burning with wood and pellets, including the reasons listed above - and, yes, we've even included handy fuel calculators, so you can get an idea of how much money you can save. Enjoy!

Fuel Calculators

First things first...The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) has put together a quick Fuel Efficiency Calculator that can give you an idea of how much money you may be able to save annually.  You can even enter your own costs, if you want to be more accurate.

Need More Calculators?

Pellet Fuels Institute has a nice Fuel Calculator here

And hearth.com has a great Fuel Calculator of their own, here

Finally, woodpellets.com has an oil vs. pellet calculator, here

But wait, there's more...

--We're always touting the fact that we have so many EPA Certified (and WA State approved) wood, pellet and multi-fuel stoves in our line-up. The question has been asked before: "What's so great about that?"
Well, less smoke and more efficiency means that, besides being great for the environment (and easier on your neighbors), it actually saves you even more money.
The EPA has some good information that answers the question:  "Will switching to an EPA Certified stove really save me money?"

--The HPBA also has a short overview of how to choose the right stove for your home, here

--To help you narrow your options and explore the benefits of our stoves even further, we've put together an article that goes into some detail describing how you can choose the best stove for your needs

--Mother Earth News has an article entitled "Is Wood Heating Right for You?"  It covers some of the benefits of heating with wood and helps you decide if it's really for you.

--Click Here for more E.S.W. News Items

And, finally,

--Click here for Our Home Page to see specific Englander, Timber Ridge and Summers Heat stove descriptions for wood, pellet and multi-fuel models.

Thank You

Thank you for your inquiry!  We will be in touch with you shortly about your request

Warranty Claim Request

If you believe your part is covered under Warranty, please fill out the Warranty Claim Form and we will process asap.  As a reminder, Parts are covered for one year from date of purchase. The firebox (welded seams, etc.) is covered for five years. Consult your owner’s manual Warranty page to see what is covered. If your part is NOT still covered by Warranty, please visit our online store or call (800) 516-3636. Click Here to see a sample warranty policy. Your unit’s warranty may differ, consult your stove’s owner’s manual. Click here to find your manual.

Warranty Registrations

Imperial Pellet (IP)

Scroll through and see which maintenance issue you would like to address:

Installation

Floor Protection and Mobile Home Installation

Start up

Thermostat Installation and Operation

Daily Maintenance

Semi-Weekly Maintenance

Monthly Maintenance

Annual Maintenance: Cleaning your Exhaust Blower

Annual Maintenance: Cleaning your Room Air Blower

Annual Maintenance: Cradle Removal And Cleaning

Cleaning Fines from the Hopper

Checking your Gaskets: the Dollar Bill Method

Component Replacement: Feed Auger Assembly

Component Replacement & Cleaning: Convection Room Air Blower

Component Replacement: Combustion Exhaust Blower

Component Replacement: Vacuum Sensor

Component Replacement: Hopper Lid Safety Switch

Component Replacement: Igniter

Stove Paint

Component Replacement: Door Glass

Component Replacement: Control Boards

Ash Vacuum System

All Videos

Evolution Pellet (EP)

Scroll through and see which maintenance issue you would like to address:

Initial Set Up & Dry Run

Freestanding Stove Installation

Floor Protection and Mobile Home Installation

Start up

Thermostat Installation and Operation

Daily Maintenance

Semi-Weekly Maintenance

Monthly Maintenance

Annual Maintenance

Component Replacement: Feed Auger Assembly

Component Replacement & Cleaning: Convection Room Air Blower

Component Replacement: Combustion Exhaust Blower

Component Replacement: Vacuum Sensor

Component Replacement: Hopper Lid Safety Switch

Component Replacement: Igniter

Component Replacement: Gasket

Component Replacement: Door Glass

Component Replacement: Control Boards

Converting a Freestanding to Insert Model

Fireplace Insert Installation

Ash Vacuum System

Contact Information

All Videos

Multi-Fuel Stoves

Scroll through and see which maintenance issue you would like to address:

Initial Set Up & Dry Run

Stove Installation

Burning Alternative Fuels: Corn, Cherry Pits and Pellets

Daily Maintenance

Semi-Weekly Maintenance

Monthly Maintenance

Annual Maintenance

Gasket Maintenance

Component Replacement: Fiberboard

Component Replacement: Rear Cover Panel

Component Replacement: Convection Room Air Blower

Component Replacement: Feed Auger Assembly

Component Replacement & Cleaning: Combustion Exhaust Blower and Gasket

Component Replacement: Igniter Pump

Component Replacement: Control Boards

Component Replacement: Igniter

Component Replacement: Stirrer Motor Assembly

Hopper Lid Safety Switch

Contact Information

All Videos

Auto Start Maintainance

Scroll through and see which maintenance issue you would like to address:

Initial Set Up & Dry Run

Stove Installation

Start up

Ash Removal and Disposal

Daily Maintenance

Semi-Weekly Maintenance

Monthly Maintenance

Annual Maintenance

Gasket Maintenance: Burn Pot

Gasket Maintenance: Window and Door

Gasket Maintenance: Hopper Lid

Component Replacement: Combustion Exhaust Blower and Gasket

Component Replacement: Feed Auger Assembly

Component Replacement & Cleaning: Convection Room Air Blower

Component Replacement: Igniter Pump

Hopper Lid Safety Switch

Component Replacement: Control Boards

All Videos

 

Pellet Auxiliary Heaters Maintainance Video

Scroll through and see which maintenance issue you would like to address:

Initial Set Up and Dry Run

Installation

Floor Protection and Mobile Home Installation

Start up

Thermostat Installation and Operation

Thermostat Modes

Daily Maintenance

Ash Removal and Disposal

Exhaust Chamber Cleaning

Venting Pipe Cleaning

Annual Maintenance: Cleaning your Exhaust Blower

Annual Maintenance: Cleaning your Room Air Blower

Cleaning the Hopper and Auger

Checking your Gaskets: the Dollar Bill Method

Component Replacement: Feed Auger Assembly

Component Replacement & Cleaning: Convection Room Air Blower

Component Replacement: Combustion Exhaust Blower

Component Replacement: Vacuum Sensor

Component Replacement: Igniter

Component Replacement: Hopper Lid Safety Switch

Gaskets and Stove Paint

Component Replacement: Door Glass

Component Replacement: Control Boards

Ash Vacuum System

Contact us

All Videos

Products

Products:

 

 

Videos

Featured Videos





How to videos

 

Products

All of the product videos can be found here and we're adding more as time goes on.

 

Videos

Take a look at all of our product information and maintenance videos here. We update often, so check back regularly!

 

Products:

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Service Videos

For all your service needs from installation to manintainance instructions.

Multi-Fuel Stoves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pellet Auxiliary Heaters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auto Start Pellet

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Evolution Pellet (EP)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Imperial Pellet (IP)

What stove will best fit my family’s needs?

(Be sure to also check out 'Will a wood or pellet stove save me money?'  for more info.)

-- If you are looking for that "perfect stove" to heat your home, you already know that the 'Alternative Fuel' options available to you are nearly endless.  And if you talk to stove manufacturers, local dealers or even your neighbors, you are likely to get varying opinions as to what type of stove - and fuel - will work best for your home (or workshop, or whatever you want to heat)...

Fortunately, England's Stove Works (ESW) has long known that there are certain benefits to each type of fuel -- and that's why we offer a full, diverse product line to our dealers and to our customers.  In addition, we have designed and manufactured these models with many convenient and attractive options, to make that "perfect stove" for your particular home.

Following are some of the benefits of each type of stove that we make to burn these different types of fuels: 
wood, pellet, and 'multi-fuel.'

England's Stove Works wood stoves are the 'originals' - the stoves we built our early reputation on - and are still popular today, due mostly to the popularity and accessibility of wood fuel.  Many people have access to land that can provide firewood; those who don't can usually purchase wood at a much lower cost than a comparable amount of heating oil.  

Our wood stoves provide an excellent amount of radiant heat, along with circulated heat - and we now include blowers with our models for even more value (see the product pages).   In addition, our wood stoves have so much surface area that you can easily heat several dishes on them simultaneously, if you like (or if you must, as in the case of a power failure).  Add to that the fact that many consider wood heat the warmest and most satisfactory heat, and certainly the most enjoyable to view (each ESW wood stove has an ample glass viewing area), and it is easy to understand why our wood stoves remain so popular.  A few years ago we announced a new, non-catalytic wood stove line with a larger glass viewing area than any units we had previously manufactured. The high-tech "XBT" (tm) firebox on these units provides for cleaner, more efficient heat - in fact, these models (which ship with a pedestal and legs included) are EPA Certified and WA State Approved, and are available in sizes that heat from 800 sq. ft. up to 2,200 sq. ft. The non-catalytic "XBT" (tm) firebox is also used in our 1,500 sq. ft. masonry fireplace insert model.
(As a footnote here, keep in mind that concerns with winter power outages - which often become extended and very uncomfortable - have made wood stove heat a priority for many rural homeowners.)

Another great model that has maintained immense popularity over the years is the ESW add-on wood furnace. When fed into your existing ductwork, this powerful unit can heat 3,000 sq. ft. - or, it can simply "dump" heated air into a large open area, such as a workshop. Since we've made more than a few of these over the years, and realize where people are apt to place them in their homes, ESW was the first to add something unique to its add-on furnace: a standard viewing glass that allows you to check on your fire from the top of your stairs or from across the room. A sizeable 850 cfm blower and thermostat (both included) help keep heat even and constant.

To summarize, England's Stove Works wood stoves are available with many options, including freestanding and insert styling, as well as different colors of trim and the ability to interchange between legs and a pedestal on some models.  Different models heat from 800-1,200 sq. ft. (for an economical choice) to approximately 3,000 sq. ft.  Close-clearance heat shields and mobile home adaptability are also available for most models.

England's Stove Works pellet stoves are popular in large part because they are so environmentally-friendly and efficient.  Pellet fuel is made from wood waste and 'biomass' (commonly grown) materials, and has very low emission levels, which allows for a clean burn with minimum soot, ash and creosote.   Pellets are very convenient because they are sold in bags which are easily moved and stored; loading them into the stove is also easy (a typical pellet hopper may only need to be loaded once or twice a day).  Other benefits include the absence of log splitting, the peace-of-mind of clean storage and the fact that each ESW pellet stove uses less electricity than four 100-watt light bulbs, even when set on the "high" setting. 

With the many benefits of pellet fuel, it is easy to see why our pellet stoves are big sellers.  All of our models have glass viewing areas, air wash systems, built-in blowers and strong, sturdy auger feed systems, as well as our "Auto-Start" one-touch ignition system technology.  Available units range from our fireplace insert model to a model that can heat 2,200 sq. ft., to a model that can hold an impressive 120 lbs. of pellets in its hopper.  All of our pellet models are EPA Certified and WA State approved, which means that they have passed stringent testing and can be sold and operated where other units cannot.  The freestanding models are even mobile home approved...And, each of our pellet stoves can be used with our wall thermostat or our remote thermostat - your choice. Finally, we have added a free outside air kit to each of our pellet units, as well as complimentary trim with many models (see product pages) - adding over $100 value, at no extra charge!

Recent on our list of pellet models is our "Evolution Pellet" stove, which has beautiful ceramic logs and a realistic brick fiberboard. This stove can be purchased as a freestanding model; it is also available as a fireplace insert that is approved for masonry fireplace installation, and it can work in a "zero-clearance" pre-fabricated fireplace (or you can even convert the freestanding model to a fireplace insert with our Conversion Kit at a later time).  Also new to our line is the "Imperial Pellet" unit, which has a uniquely-European look and very convenient swing-out door panels for ease of use.

And along the way, ESW recognized that some homeowners want even more flexibility in their fuel choices - so we designed a "Multi-Fuel" stove. This model is EPA Certified to burn wood pellets, but can also burn corn or cherry pits (and more). The Control Board is pre-programmed for different fuels, and the Auto-Start ignition technology on this unit allows it to light the toughest fuels, including corn! A beautiful cast door design and decorative side panels (included at no extra charge) round out the elegant appearance of this stove, and it will heat an impressive 2,200 sq. ft.

No matter what your fuel choice may be, all ESW stoves are backed by a five year limited warranty on the firebox, a one year limited warranty on electrical components, and more, including toll-free Technical Support and a vast knowledge database on our web site.  These stoves have a long-lasting, nationwide reputation for efficiency, good craftsmanship and very economic pricing.  Whatever type of fuel you choose to heat your home with, England's Stove Works has a stove that can meet and exceed your expectations.

(Be sure to also check out 'Will a wood or pellet stove save me money?' for more info.)

Tracking Your Order from England’s Stove Works

How do I track my parts order?

We take pride in our Technical Support as well as our fast shipping, so rest assured that your parts order will be processed asap. 

If you gave us an email address, information on tracking should automatically come to your Inbox. However, if that's not the case, here's how to track your parts order from England's Stove Works:

(PLEASE NOTE -- FOR WEB AND PHONE ORDERS: We do enter and ship orders asap, but please give at least one to two business days after placing your order before you attempt to track it, so that it can get into the tracking system.)

WEB ORDERS:  Click Here to go to the UPS Tracking page to track "by Reference Number." In the Reference Number field on the UPS site, simply enter the (shipping) zip code that you used when placing your web order, then the order number that our online shopping program gave you, with NO spaces...(for example: 2457486523). Click the "Track" button -- it's that simple!

ORDERS THAT ARE PHONED IN:  Click Here to go to the UPS Tracking page to track "by Reference Number." In the Reference Number field on the UPS site, enter the (shipping) zip code that you used when placing your phoned-in order, then the order (or claim) number that our Customer Service rep. gave you, with NO spaces...(for example: 2457486523). Click the "Track" button -- again, it's that simple!

Note: If you do not have this information, you may call (800) 245-6489 and we can find and track your order for you...but if you have this information, please keep it handy, it can save you time if you track your order yourself.

Pellet Grill Maintenance and Troubleshooting

(Click on the buttons below for a PDF containing more information)

 

  

(Includes maitenance, cleaning instructions, and ash disposal instructions)

 

 

(Includes troubleshooting, wiring diagram, and control board layout)

Gasket Maintenance

One of the biggest keys to getting peak performance from your pellet unit is gasket maintenance. Our pellet units are designed to pull combustion air in through the fire and eject the exhaust out through the vent pipe.

The gaskets which seal around the window (AC-GGK), the door (AC-DGKNC), the ash pan (PU-GGK) and the hopper lid (PU-HLG) ensure that the air that is pulled through the stove is not pulled through these areas. Air that enters through leaky gaskets is air that does not pass through the fire, leading to incomplete burning of the fuel and diminished performance.

The combustion blower gasket (PU-CBG) will need replacing when the component it is sealing is removed.

Examples of Worn Gaskets

  

 (This gasket should be replaced)                              (Frayed strings can be trimmed but

                                                                                   this gasket should be replaced soon.)


Links for Replacement Gaskets

(Click on your gasket to go to online store)


"AC-GGK"

Window Glass Gasket Kit

"AC-DGKNC"

Door Gasket Kit

"PU-HLG"

Hopper Lid Gasket

"PU-GGK"

Ash Pan Gasket

        "PU-CBG"            Combustion Blower Gasket

Fuel Feed Related Problems

The feed system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The auger runs intermittently feeding measured batches of fuel down the drop chute. The auger is run by a motor and gearbox assembly. Feed related issues fall under three categories; Auger is jammed, auger motor is not getting power from the board, or the auger motor is defective.

Auger is jammed

If the auger is not turning it could be physically jammed. Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets. Also, excessive amounts of sawdust in the base of the auger tube can jam the auger. To relieve the jam, locate the auger motor assembly at the rear of the stove, and begin by loosening the two allen set screws on either side of the cast iron auger motor coupler. Slide the auger assembly out of the tube until it rests on the air intake and clear out all debris, especially at the base.

                 

Auger motor not getting power

The motor will get hot fairly quickly if it is getting power. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. The top auger is wired through a vacuum switch, if this switch is bad, or if its vacuum hose is cracked or disconnected the top auger will not run. To confirm this locate the switch and follow the wires back. Remove the wire from the switch that connects to the auger motor, follow the other wire from the switch to the control board and unplug it from the board, then  connect the first wire to the empty terminal on the control board so that the auger motor wires are both leading to the circuit board. Then turn the unit on if the motor runs, check the wires and the vacuum hose and replace if necessary.

Auger motor is defective

If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger motor must be replaced.

Vacuum related stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch is wired through the auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged, disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.

Electrical Troubleshooting

Blown Fuses

The unit has a 6 amp 125 volt fuse located on the control board which protects the unit from most power spikes

(Fuse Location)

England's stove works does strongly recommend the use of a surge protector with our pellet units as an added protection. Some spikes such as are caused by lightning strikes and the like may still cause damage to the board as they would to most any electrical appliance. An internal short could also cause a fuse to blow. In most cases a blown fuse from external spike would not cause damage to the unit. Should there have been damage to the electrical system the most likely symptoms would be;

1. Additional fuses blowing as soon as the unit is plugged back in.

2. Fuse blowing when on button is pushed.

3. A component running when stove is plugged in without turning the unit on (most common would be the room air blower, the cartridge heater, or the auger motor). In some cases, provided the unit was not damaged but is not acting correctly the control board may be "rebooted" or reset back to its normal operating parameters, in this case normal function may be restored without replacing components.

Contact customer service at 800-245-6489 for instructions if needed to reboot the control board. A blown fuse from an internal short may be caused by a bare wire or a wire disconnecting from its terminal on a component and touching the hull or other metal component of the unit. For this reason, should a fuse be blown it is recommended that all wires should be inspected prior to replacement of the fuse.

Component Location

Faulty Motor/Blower

There are three electric motors in your pellet unit, each with a specific job. One of these motors runs continuously as soon as the unit is turned on (the exhaust blower) auger motor comes on intermittently, and the room air blower comes on once the stove reaches temperature.

Checking auger motors

Follow these steps after determining the auger itself is not physically jammed. The auger motor is wired through a vacuum switch so the switch may be the cause for the motor not running. To check this motor without the switch, hardwire the auger motor directly to the board. Pull the black wire off of the control board so that there is an empty space beside the yellow wire. Move the wire on the vacuum switch that goes to the auger motor to the board beside the yellow wire. If the motor will now turn the motor is good and likely the vacuum switch or the circuit board is bad.

Checking Room Air Blower

To test the function of the room air blower you can put stove into diagnostic mode  and follow the instructions for energizing the room air blower.

Checking Exhaust Blower

To check the exhaust blower put stove into diagnostic mode to test, or simply turn the unit on and check the blower (located on the left side of the unit) for function.

Ash Removal and Disposal

Daily Maintenance

Press the "OFF" button and allow the stove to complete the shut-down cycle

Open the front panel, then the main door of the stove and use an old paint brush or putty knife to move ash from around the burn pot into the open areas beside the cradle. Use a long handled screwdriver or putty knife to remove any deposits left in the burn pot. Pull the ash pan latches out and turn, then slide the ash pan out of the stove.  Dump the ashes into a metal container and store them on a non-combustible surface to allow any embers to cool before disposal. Slide the ash pan back into the stove; turn the latch, making certain it catches the lip of the ash pan opening. Remove the burn pot by lifting it straight up and out of the cradle. Use screwdriver or putty knife to remove any deposits inside of the burn pot. Make sure all air orifices are clear and unrestricted. Remove any ash from the bottom of the firebox and insert burn pot back into cradle. The stove is now ready to resume normal operation.

(Insert pictures here)

Bi-Weekly Maintenance

Bi‐weekly maintenance should include the steps listed in this section AS WELL AS the steps listed in the “Daily Maintenance” section.  

Remove the baffle by grasping the baffle in the center, lift up on the rear of the baffle and slide it towards the back of the stove. Then tilt the front downward, moving it down towards the cradle. Last, tilt one end up, the other down and remove from the opening of the stove. When the baffle is out of the stove, the area where fly‐ash accumulates on the firebox shelf will be clear. The use of a utility vacuum is highly recommended because it will prevent fly‐ash from falling through the exhaust holes and into the exhaust chamber. Ash Vacuum (Part # AC-AV). After removing all the fly‐ash from behind the baffle, reinsert the baffle into the stove, using the reverse of the process detailed above.

(Insert Baffle Plate picture)

Monthly Maintenance

Monthly maintenance should include the steps listed in this section AS WELL AS the steps listed above.

The exhaust chamber of the stove was intentionally designed as an ash accumulation area.  Allowing ash to accumulate here prevents excess ash build-up in the combustion blower and the venting system. The exhaust chamber is accessed via the two clean-out ports located on the back wall of the firebox, near the bottom. Clean the exhaust chamber AFTER cleaning the firebox shelf and heat exchanger tubes, because cleaning them will deposit ash into the exhaust chamber. Use a 5/16” socket wrench to remove the two screws which hold each of the clean-out covers in place and remove the cleanout covers from the firebox. Using a utility type vacuum cleaner Ash Vacuum (Part # AC-AV) vacuum the fly ash out of the exhaust chamber. A short piece of hose can be attached to the end of the utility vacuum line and can be useful in reaching the ash which accumulates between the clean-out ports. Once all ash has been removed from the exhaust chamber, reinstall the cleanout port covers, using the screws previously removed.

(Insert Burn Pot Assembly Picture)

Yearly Maintenance

Yearly (or end of season) maintenance should include the steps listed in this section AS WELL AS the steps listed in the “Daily Maintenance,” “Bi‐weekly Maintenance,” and “Monthly Maintenance” sections.

The stove and the flue system (Click Here for Flue Cleaning) should be given a complete cleaning at the end of the heating season.  Remove the burn pot assembly, clean it thoroughly, and re-install it.  This will require new burn pot cradle gasket (Part # PU-CGEP). Be sure to tighten the set screws when you replace them, but do not over-tighten. In addition to the cleaning mentioned earlier, the Exhaust Blower should be removed annually and the blower tube vacuumed of any ash build up.  When cleaning or replacing the blower a new combustion blower gasket (Part # PU-CBMG) should be added between the blower flange and the steel exhaust tube. Soot and Fly ash: Formation and Need for Removal - The products of combustion will contain small particles of fly ash. The fly ash will collect in the exhaust venting system and restrict the flow of flue gases.  Incomplete combustion, such as occurs during startup, shutdown, or incorrect operation of the room heater will lead to some soot formation which will collect in the exhaust venting system. The exhaust venting system should be inspected at least once every year to determine if cleaning is necessary.

Imperial Pellet Stove

(Click the links below for more information)

 

Gasket Maintenance

One of the biggest keys to getting peak performance from your pellet unit is gasket maintenance. Our pellet units are designed to pull combustion air in through the fire and eject the exhaust out through the vent pipe.

The gaskets which seal around the window (AC-GGK), the door (AC-DGKCPM), the ash pan (AC-GGK) and the hopper lid (PU-HLG) ensure that the air that is pulled through the stove is not pulled through these areas. Air that enters through leaky gaskets is air that does not pass through the fire, leading to incomplete burning of the fuel and diminished performance.

The combustion blower gasket (PU-CBG) will need replacing when the component it is sealing is removed.

Examples of Worn Gaskets

  

 (This gasket should be replaced)                              (Frayed strings can be trimmed but

                                                                                   this gasket should be replaced soon.)


Links for Replacement Gaskets

(Click on your gasket to go to online store)


"AC-GGK"

Window Glass Gasket Kit

"AC-DGKCPM"

Door Gasket Kit

"PU-HLG"

Hopper Lid Gasket

"PU-GGK"

Ash Pan Gasket

        "PU-CBG"            Combustion Blower Gasket

Fuel Feed Related Problems

The feed system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The auger runs intermittently feeding measured batches of fuel down the drop chute. The auger is run by a motor and gearbox assembly. Feed related issues fall under three categories; Auger is jammed, auger motor is not getting power from the board, or the auger motor is defective.

Auger is Jammed

If the auger is not turning it could be physically jammed. Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets. Also, excessive amounts of sawdust in the base of the auger tube can jam the auger. To relieve the jam, locate the auger motor assembly at the rear of the stove, and begin by loosening the two allen set screws on either side of the cast iron auger motor coupler. Slide the auger assembly out of the tube until it rests on the air intake and clear out all debris, especially at the base.

Picture Needed Here

Auger Motor Not Getting Power

The motor will get hot fairly quickly if it is getting power. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. The top auger is wired through a vacuum switch, if this switch is bad, or if its vacuum hose is cracked or disconnected the top auger will not run. To confirm this locate the switch and follow the wires back. Remove the wire from the switch that connects to the auger motor, follow the other wire from the switch to the control board and unplug it from the board, then  connect the first wire to the empty terminal on the control board so that the auger motor wires are both leading to the circuit board. Then turn the unit on if the motor runs, check the wires and the vacuum hose and replace if necessary.

Auger Motor is Defective

If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger motor must be replaced.

Vacuum Related Stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch is wired through the auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged, disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.


Useful Links

Wiring Page

Feed Rate/Thermostat Problems

Electrical Troubleshooting

Blown Fuses

The unit has a 6 amp 125 volt fuse located on the control board which protects the unit from most power spikes

(Fuse Location)

England's stove works does strongly recommend the use of a surge protector with our pellet units as an added protection. Some spikes such as are caused by lightning strikes and the like may still cause damage to the board as they would to most any electrical appliance. An internal short could also cause a fuse to blow. In most cases a blown fuse from external spike would not cause damage to the unit. Should there have been damage to the electrical system the most likely symptoms would be;

1. Additional fuses blowing as soon as the unit is plugged back in.

2. Fuse blowing when on button is pushed.

3. A component running when stove is plugged in without turning the unit on most common would be the room air blower, the cartridge heater, or the top auger motor. in some cases, provided the unit was not damaged but is not acting correctly the control board may be "rebooted" or reset back to its normal operating parameters, in this case normal function may be restored without replacing components.

Contact customer service at 800-245-6489 for instructions if needed to reboot the control board. A blown fuse from an internal short may be caused by a bare wire or a wire disconnecting from its terminal on a component and touching the hull or other metal component of the unit. For this reason, should a fuse be blown it is recommended that all wires should be inspected prior to replacement of the fuse.

Component Location

(Insert Image Here)

Faulty Motor/Blower

There are three electric motors in your pellet unit, each with a specific job. One of these motors runs continuously as soon as the unit is turned on (the exhaust blower) auger motor comes on intermittently, and the room air blower comes on once the stove reaches temperature.

Checking auger motors

Follow these steps after determining the auger itself is not physically jammed. The auger motor is wired through a vacuum switch so the switch may be the cause for the motor not running. To check this motor without the switch, hardwire the auger motor directly to the board. Pull the black wire off of the control board so that there is an empty space beside the yellow wire. Move the wire on the vacuum switch that goes to the auger motor to the board beside the yellow wire. If the motor will now turn the motor is good and likely the vacuum switch or the circuit board is bad.

Checking Room Air Blower

To test the function of the room air blower you can put stove into diagnostic mode  and follow the instructions for energizing the room air blower.

Checking Exhaust Blower

To check the exhaust blower put stove into diagnostic mode to test, or simply turn the unit on and check the blower (located on the left side of the unit) for function.


Useful Links

Thermostat Wiring

Diagnostic Page

Ash Removal and Disposal

Daily Ash Removal

Press the "OFF" button and allow the stove to complete the shut-down cycle and cool completely prior to opening the door. A long-handled screwdriver or long-handled putty knife can be used to scrape off any build-up or crust in the burn pot area. Pull the handles above the ash pan toward you to open the access panels inside the stove and push ashes into the ash pan. Be sure to close panels back securely prior to operating stove.

Semi-Weekly Ash Removal

Semi-Weekly maintenance should include the steps listed in here AS WELL AS all steps listed above. Allow the unit to completely cool and remove the ash pan by lifting up on the ash pan handle and pulling forward. The ashes should be placed in a non-combustible container with an airtight lid and should always be placed on a non-combustible surface until completely cooled and free of hot cinders. Remove burn pot and check for any build-up in the front of the burn area. Clean out all air holes. The cradle assembly (in which the burn pot rests) should also be thoroughly cleaned.

Monthly Ash Removal

Monthly maintenance should include the steps listed in here AS WELL AS all steps listed above. Use a screwdriver or chisel and break any creosote build-up in the front of the unit, where the pellets are fed into the burn pot from the Auger Tube. Also inspect your flue pipes and remove ash buildup from the clean-out tee.

Annual Cleaning

The stove and the flue system (Click Here for Flue Cleaning) should be given a complete cleaning at the end of the heating season.  Remove the burn pot, clean it thoroughly, and re-install it.  In addition to the cleaning mentioned earlier, the Exhaust Blower should be removed annually and the blower tube vacuumed of any ash build up.  When cleaning or replacing the blower a new combustion blower gasket (Part # PU-CBMG) should be added between the blower flange and the steel exhaust tube. Soot and Fly ash: Formation and Need for Removal - The products of combustion will contain small particles of fly ash. The fly ash will collect in the exhaust venting system and restrict the flow of flue gases.  Incomplete combustion, such as occurs during startup, shutdown, or incorrect operation of the room heater will lead to some soot formation which will collect in the exhaust venting system. The exhaust venting system should be inspected at least once every year to determine if cleaning is necessary.

 

(Burn Pot Assembly(Left) and Combustion Blower Gasket(Right))

Multi-Fuel Troubleshooting

(Click the links below for more information)

 

Gasket Maintenance

One of the biggest keys to getting peak performance from your pellet unit is gasket maintenance. Our pellet units are designed to pull combustion air in through the fire and eject the exhaust out through the vent pipe.

The gaskets which seal around the window (AC-GGK), the door (AC-DGKNC), the ash pan (AC-GGK) and the hopper lid (PU-HLG) ensure that the air that is pulled through the stove is not pulled through these areas. Air that enters through leaky gaskets is air that does not pass through the fire, leading to incomplete burning of the fuel and diminished performance.

The combustion blower gasket (PU-CBG) will need replacing when the component it is sealing is removed.

Examples of Worn Gaskets

  

 (This gasket should be replaced)                              (Frayed strings can be trimmed but

                                                                                   this gasket should be replaced soon.)


Replacement Gaskets - Visit your model's page at store.heatredefined.com to see the replacement gaskets for your stove

Examples:

 

AC-DGKNC.jpg

"AC-GGK"

Window Glass Gasket Kit

"AC-DGKNC"

Door Gasket Kit

"PU-HLG"

Hopper Lid Gasket

"AC-GGK"

Ash Pan Gasket

        "PU-CBG"            Combustion Blower Gasket

Fuel Feed Related Problems

The feed system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The auger runs intermittently feeding measured batches of fuel down the drop chute. The auger is run by a motor and gearbox assembly. Feed related issues fall under three categories; Auger is jammed, auger motor is not getting power from the board, or the auger motor is defective.

Auger is Jammed

If the auger is not turning it could be physically jammed. Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets. Also, excessive amounts of sawdust in the base of the auger tube can jam the auger. To relieve the jam, locate the auger motor assembly at the rear of the stove, and begin by loosening the two allen set screws on either side of the cast iron auger motor coupler. Slide the auger assembly out of the tube until it rests on the air intake and clear out all debris, especially at the base.

Picture Needed Here

Auger Motor Not Getting Power

The motor will get hot fairly quickly if it is getting power. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. The top auger is wired through a vacuum switch, if this switch is bad, or if its vacuum hose is cracked or disconnected the top auger will not run. To confirm this locate the switch and follow the wires back. Remove the wire from the switch that connects to the auger motor, follow the other wire from the switch to the control board and unplug it from the board, then  connect the first wire to the empty terminal on the control board so that the auger motor wires are both leading to the circuit board. Then turn the unit on if the motor runs, check the wires and the vacuum hose and replace if necessary.

Auger Motor is Defective

If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger motor must be replaced.

Vacuum Related Stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch is wired through the auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged, disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.


Useful Links

Wiring Page

Feed Rate/Thermostat Problems

Electrical Troubleshooting

Blown Fuses

The unit has a 6 amp 125 volt fuse located on the control board which protects the unit from most power spikes

(Fuse Location)

England's stove works does strongly recommend the use of a surge protector with our pellet units as an added protection. Some spikes such as are caused by lightning strikes and the like may still cause damage to the board as they would to most any electrical appliance. An internal short could also cause a fuse to blow. In most cases a blown fuse from external spike would not cause damage to the unit. Should there have been damage to the electrical system the most likely symptoms would be;

1. Additional fuses blowing as soon as the unit is plugged back in.

2. Fuse blowing when on button is pushed.

3. A component running when stove is plugged in without turning the unit on most common would be the room air blower, the cartridge heater, or the top auger motor. in some cases, provided the unit was not damaged but is not acting correctly the control board may be "rebooted" or reset back to its normal operating parameters, in this case normal function may be restored without replacing components.

Contact customer service at 800-245-6489 for instructions if needed to reboot the control board. A blown fuse from an internal short may be caused by a bare wire or a wire disconnecting from its terminal on a component and touching the hull or other metal component of the unit. For this reason, should a fuse be blown it is recommended that all wires should be inspected prior to replacement of the fuse.

Component Location

(See your stove's owner's manual. If you do not have one, you may download one from our Support page.)

Faulty Motor/Blower

There are three electric motors in your pellet unit, each with a specific job. One of these motors runs continuously as soon as the unit is turned on (the exhaust blower) auger motor comes on intermittently, and the room air blower comes on once the stove reaches temperature.

Checking auger motors

Follow these steps after determining the auger itself is not physically jammed. The auger motor is wired through a vacuum switch so the switch may be the cause for the motor not running. To check this motor without the switch, hardwire the auger motor directly to the board. Pull the black wire off of the control board so that there is an empty space beside the yellow wire. Move the wire on the vacuum switch that goes to the auger motor to the board beside the yellow wire. If the motor will now turn the motor is good and likely the vacuum switch or the circuit board is bad.

Checking Room Air Blower

To test the function of the room air blower you can put stove into diagnostic mode  and follow the instructions for energizing the room air blower.

Checking Exhaust Blower

To check the exhaust blower put stove into diagnostic mode to test, or simply turn the unit on and check the blower (located on the left side of the unit) for function.

Ash Removal and Disposal

Pellet Auxiliary Heater Troubleshooting

(Click the links below for more information)

 

Dirty Burn

My Stove is Burning Dirty.
My Stove is Sooting.
My Exhaust is Smoking Heavily.

Possible Causes

  1. Bad pellets, wet or old pellets, pellets which have been wet will not burn as clean or as hot.  Try using a different bag of pellets especially if the ones being used are old, from a torn bag, or may have been stored in a damp environment. It is important to have dry storage for pellet fuel.

  2. Improper installation, lack of outside air source or using too long a pipe to bring in air will cause air deficiency. Too long a flue pipe, or too many elbows, intake or exhaust can also lead to a dirty burn.  Air flow is very important to get proper performance improper installation can cause resistance to the flow of air, causing fuel to burn dirty. Refer to installation manual for proper installation to compare your installation to. Click Here for Diagrams and Instructions for proper installation

  3. Leaky gaskets, door, window, and ash pan gaskets, as well as gasket behind burn box will decrease available air through the fire. To test for leaking door, window or ash pan gaskets, turn the stove on without building a fire, close the door and take a lit match or lighter and move the flame around the edge of the window, around the door, and around the ash pan. If the gasket is leaking, the flame will be pulled toward the leak as air is sucked in past the gasket. Gasket should then be replaced. Click Here for Gasket Maintenance

  4. Overfeeding, if too much fuel is cycled into the burn chamber, there is insufficient air volume to give a complete, clean burn. A bag of pellets should normally last from 16 to 24 hours (smaller pellets tend to feed faster than longer ones) if the 40 lb. bag is not lasting that long contact customer service to have a technician walk you through a check of the programming of the control board.

  5. Insufficient combustion air, combustion blower is not running at sufficient speed. The exhaust blower should run at about 3000 rpm. Lubrication may help but replacement of the exhaust blower is the recommended course of action.

  6. Ash buildup in flue, if flue is not cleaned regularly ash buildup will restrict air volume being exhausted from stove. The flue system should be cleaned on a regular basis. We recommend it be cleaned at least once a month or once per ton of pellets used. Click Here for Cleaning Instructions

  7. Ash buildup in heat exchanger/firebox area, if firebox and heat exchanger are not cleaned regularly ash buildup will restrict airflow through the fire. The firebox must be cleaned on a regular basis and the holes in the firebox must be kept clear. The heat exchanger is accessed behind the baffle, and through the two access plates on either side of the burn pot cradle. These areas should be cleaned at least bi-weekly.

  8. Leaving hopper lid open/unlatched, when hopper is not sealed down tight air can be pulled through the hopper and feed system reducing the amount of air through the fire. It is extremely important that the hopper lid be latched down tight while the stove is in operation. Airflow may occur through the auger system and in the event of a power failure or error shutdown smoke can travel back into the hopper if the lid is not sealed down tight!

  9. Improper fuel, burning corn or cherry pits will cause a dirty burn because of the high ash, moisture and sugar content. The use of alternative fuel is possible when mixed with pellets but is not recommended. If the unit is burning dirty and these fuels have been used, clean the entire stove out thoroughly (flue system as well) and burn just premium hardwood pellets to see if the problem goes away. If using these fuels is still desired, adjust the mixture to use less corn or pits per bag of pellets.

  10. High altitude, air density at high altitude can cause dirty burn simply because of  the lack of available oxygen. In installations above 5,000 ft. above sea level the exhaust should be expanded to 4" pellet vent pipe (ac-3100 kit) and the outside air intake should be run with 3" pipe. Click Here for High Altitude Installations

Troubleshooting Guide

England's Stove Works was started, and is still owned by,  a family that believes strongly in a "Do It Yourself" spirit.  We intentionally design and build our stoves so that any homeowner can maintain his or her unit with basic tools,  and we're always more than happy to show you how to do the job as easily and as inexpensively as possible.

From our Pellet Service Video,  to our downloadable service sheets,  to this new "wizard-style" walk-through Troubleshooting guide, we have always tried to help our customers stay "heat-ready," especially in situations like we're experiencing this season.

Take a look around this Guide and the rest of the "help" section of our web site, and call  our Customer Service Department at   (800) 245-6489   if you have any further questions.

 

Please Select your Type of Stove below.

E-4 (Time and Temperature Fault Code)

This is a "time and temperature" fault code: This code is only found in certain models. Essentially, it is caused when the unit drops a certain amount of temperature in a short amount of time, and its purpose is to take away the possibility of feeding fuel into a smoldering condition after a gap in feeding.

Common causes for E-4 codes:

1. Pellets bridging in the hopper: In some cases, pellets can form a self-supporting dome or “bridge” over the feed auger in the bottom of the hopper. When this happens, the feed auger empties out beneath the bridge and a gap in feeding occurs. This bridge will normally collapse under its own weight (along with natural vibrations from the unit) and feeding will resume. If the gap in feeding is long enough, the resulting loss of fuel and the dying fire can cause an E-4 code. Longer pellets are usually more susceptible to this issue, and excessive pellet dust can also cause this situation.

2. Stove shutting down from lack of fuel in a cool environment: Stoves such as the utility furnace are often used in shop or basement applications. In these applications, the ambient temperatures may be lower than in a ground-floor house type of application, so in a shutdown from running out of fuel, the E-4 can occur, as the temperature drop is more rapid. This does not denote a “failure” in the unit, but is a common occurrence in cold room shutdowns.

3. Gaps in feeding due to “hot fueling” or “hot cleaning”: For pellet units which have hopper lid switches and active door switches - when either is opened, they will stop feeding, and if the gap in feeding is too great then the E-4 "time and temp." error can occur.

E-3 (Over Temperature Limit)

This unit has the ability to moderate itself should the unit attain too high a temperature.  In some cases the unit will display an E-3 and go into a cool down sequence, in other cases the top auger will be interrupted until the unit has cooled enough that it deems itself safe to continue running.

Common causes for E-3 codes (check these; more information is below this):

1. Dirty stove: As ash builds in the unit, it slows down the flow of air through it; this allows more heat to build in the unit before the exhaust leaves the stove.

2. Plugged or inoperable room fan: The room fan (or convection blower) has a dual purpose. One is to blow heat out into the room, the other is to help keep the stove cool internally, by blowing room temperature air through the unit, which scrubs heat out of the stove and pushes it out the front of the unit. Over time, these fans tend to attract “dust bunnies” and especially pet hair. This debris clogs the inlet screens on the large units and builds up on the blades of the smaller ones; in both cases it reduces the airflow through the stove, which allows the internal temperatures to rise slowly until the unit exceeds the high limit and errors out. A bad room fan will rapidly allow the unit to reach overtemp and shut down, as well.

3. Running the blower speed below the heat range: If the blower does not move enough air for the heat that the fire is making, the unit will error out as well.

4. Burning the wrong fuel in the stove: Pellet stoves are not “multifuel” stoves; they are designed to only burn wood pellets. Burning corn, grains, cherry pits, switch grass, or other fuels can result in higher temperatures and can damage the stove, as well as cause error codes.

MORE Information Concerning E-3 Codes:

  1. Smaller pellets can feed through the system faster than normal-sized ones (about 1" long on average is a normal size for pellets). This happens because the smaller the pellets are, the more they will settle into the auger at a time, which causes the unit to feed more fuel than normal in each feed setting.
  2. Running heat range higher than blower speed: The room air blower not only blows the heat into the room, but as it is doing so it also provides a cooling function to the unit internally. As room air is blown through the unit, it removes heat from it, thereby cooling the unit down. If not enough room air is moved through the unit, the heat then builds up inside the unit until over temp limit is reached. Note: this can cause damage to the unit if allowed to happen frequently.

E-2 (Failure to Start)

Auto-ignition equipped stove models (units produced in 2004 and newer) monitor themselves during the "SU" sequence (Startup) when the stove is being put into use. If the unit does not reach its minimum operating temperature within the 20 minute startup period, it will shut down and display the "E-2" code. Should this occur, and the fire does not physically light, the fuel that fed through during the startup attempt should be removed from the burn pot, the burn pot area should be cleaned (if it was not cleaned prior to attempted start) and another start should be attempted. If the unit subsequently does not start on the second attempt, the following should be checked:

Common causes for E-2 codes 

1. Igniter plugged with ash: To clear, vacuum out the burn pot, then insert a toothpick (or a straightened-out paperclip or similar item) into the igniter hole and “ream out” the airspace between the tip of the igniter rod and the backside of the hole. This will allow the heated air to pass through into the firepot, to more readily start the fire on time.

2. Igniter out of position: The igniter must have a standoff, which allows air to pass the tip to light the pellets. If the igniter rod is positioned too close to the hole into the pot, the air cannot get past the tip to light the pellets. Adjusting the igniter back to allow for a larger air gap should correct the problem.

3. If the unit fires but does not continue to run with ample heat to be able to make its proof of fire temp.: The likely issue is a disconnected heat sensor, or the “air on temp” setting being too high. To check the air on temp, push that button and look in the blower speed readout for the setting. It must be set on 1; if set higher, reset to 1 and re-attempt to start the unit. If the stove still doesn’t make it out of startup (particularly if the room fan does not come on), check the heat sensor for possible bad connection. If connected correctly, test the sensor in diagnostic; if the sensor reads a "9" in the heat range and it is connected properly, it’s bad and should be replaced.  

MORE Information Concerning E-2 Codes:

  1. The Cartridge heater itself, when energized, will start to glow within two to three minutes of turning the unit on. If the cartridge heater does not glow, the cartridge heater itself and its connections to the control board would need to be checked.
  2. When starting the unit, there is no need to place any fuel into the burn pot before lighting; the unit will allow itself enough fuel to sufficiently start. If the unit does not feed any fuel into the burn pot, there will be no fire and an E-2 code should appear. Should this be the case, inspect the auger system itself to ensure that the auger is working correctly; if it is, also ensure that the fuel is not getting hung up in the hopper.
  3. Wet fuel can severely retard the ignition process. Pellet fuel should be stored in a dry, climate controlled area, as the fuel can soak up excessive moisture; therefore, pellet bags should not be opened until fuel is needed.
  4. The position of the cartridge heater in its chamber can effect lighting as well. If the cartridge heater is not properly centered airflow would not effectively surround it before reaching the fuel, causing inconsistent starting.
  5. Other things that can cause a failure to start include:
    1. Non functional exhaust blower: This would give an E-2, followed by an E-1 as stated above. 
    2. Auger motor not running: No fuel flow would result in a fail to start.

A non functional or disconnected heat sensor: If the unit does not read sufficient heat within the startup sequence, it will assume that the unit did not start and give an E-2 code.  This can happen with a bad heat sensor, even if the unit starts normally and does get hot, and a mis-programmed "air on temp" setting; must be on 1.

E-1 (Vacuum Bypass Chip Missing)

If this stove ever shuts down displaying an E-1 code, it means that the Vacuum Bypass Chip is missing on the control board.  Contact Technical Support at 1-800-245-6489 so we can walk you through getting your stove up and running.

Gasket Maintenance

One of the biggest keys to getting peak performance from your pellet unit is gasket maintenance. Our pellet units are designed to pull combustion air in through the fire and eject the exhaust out through the vent pipe.

The gaskets which seal around the window (AC-GGKEP), the door (AC-DGKEP), the ash pan (PU-APG) and the hopper lid (PU-HLG) ensure that the air that is pulled through the stove is not pulled through these areas. Air that enters through leaky gaskets is air that does not pass through the fire, leading to incomplete burning of the fuel and diminished performance.

The combustion blower gasket (PU-CBG) will need replacing when the component it is sealing is removed.

Examples of Worn Gaskets

  

 (This gasket should be replaced)                              (Frayed strings can be trimmed but

                                                                                   this gasket should be replaced soon.)


Links for Replacement Gaskets

(Click on your gasket to go to online store)


"AC-GGKEP"

Window Glass Gasket Kit

"AC-DGKEP"

Door Gasket Kit

"PU-HLG"

Hopper Lid Gasket

"PU-APG"

Ash Pan Gasket

        "PU-CBG"            Combustion Blower Gasket

Fuel Feed Related Problems

The feed system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The auger runs intermittently feeding measured batches of fuel down the drop chute. The auger is run by a motor and gearbox assembly. Feed related issues fall under three categories; Auger is jammed, auger motor is not getting power from the board, or the auger motor is defective.

Auger is Jammed

If the auger is not turning it could be physically jammed. Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets. Also, excessive amounts of sawdust in the base of the auger tube can jam the auger. To relieve the jam, locate the auger motor assembly at the rear of the stove, and begin by loosening the two allen set screws on either side of the cast iron auger motor coupler. Slide the auger assembly out of the tube until it rests on the air intake and clear out all debris, especially at the base.

Picture Needed Here

Auger Motor Not Getting Power

The motor will get hot fairly quickly if it is getting power. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. The top auger is wired through a vacuum switch, if this switch is bad, or if its vacuum hose is cracked or disconnected the top auger will not run. To confirm this locate the switch and follow the wires back. Remove the wire from the switch that connects to the auger motor, follow the other wire from the switch to the control board and unplug it from the board, then  connect the first wire to the empty terminal on the control board so that the auger motor wires are both leading to the circuit board. Then turn the unit on if the motor runs, check the wires and the vacuum hose and replace if necessary.

Auger Motor is Defective

If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger motor must be replaced.

Vacuum Related Stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch is wired through the auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged, disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.


Useful Links

Wiring Page

Feed Rate/Thermostat Problems

E-Codes

(Click on an E-Code below for more information)

E-1 (Vacuum Bypass Chip Missing)

E-2 (Failure to Start)

E-3 (Over Temperature Limit)

E-4 (Time and Temperature Fault Code)


 

Electrical Troubleshooting

Blown Fuses

The unit has a 6 amp 125 volt fuse located on the control board which protects the unit from most power spikes

(Fuse Location)

England's stove works does strongly recommend the use of a surge protector with our pellet units as an added protection. Some spikes such as are caused by lightning strikes and the like may still cause damage to the board as they would to most any electrical appliance. An internal short could also cause a fuse to blow. In most cases a blown fuse from external spike would not cause damage to the unit. Should there have been damage to the electrical system the most likely symptoms would be;

1. Additional fuses blowing as soon as the unit is plugged back in.

2. Fuse blowing when on button is pushed.

3. A component running when stove is plugged in without turning the unit on most common would be the room air blower, the cartridge heater, or the top auger motor. in some cases, provided the unit was not damaged but is not acting correctly the control board may be "rebooted" or reset back to its normal operating parameters, in this case normal function may be restored without replacing components.

Contact customer service at 800-245-6489 for instructions if needed to reboot the control board. A blown fuse from an internal short may be caused by a bare wire or a wire disconnecting from its terminal on a component and touching the hull or other metal component of the unit. For this reason, should a fuse be blown it is recommended that all wires should be inspected prior to replacement of the fuse.

Component Location

(Insert Image Here)

Faulty Motor/Blower

There are three electric motors in your pellet unit, each with a specific job. One of these motors runs continuously as soon as the unit is turned on (the exhaust blower) auger motor comes on intermittently, and the room air blower comes on once the stove reaches temperature.

Checking auger motors

Follow these steps after determining the auger itself is not physically jammed. The auger motor is wired through a vacuum switch so the switch may be the cause for the motor not running. To check this motor without the switch, hardwire the auger motor directly to the board. Pull the black wire off of the control board so that there is an empty space beside the yellow wire. Move the wire on the vacuum switch that goes to the auger motor to the board beside the yellow wire. If the motor will now turn the motor is good and likely the vacuum switch or the circuit board is bad.

Checking Room Air Blower

To test the function of the room air blower you can put stove into diagnostic mode  and follow the instructions for energizing the room air blower.

Checking Exhaust Blower

To check the exhaust blower put stove into diagnostic mode to test, or simply turn the unit on and check the blower (located on the left side of the unit) for function.

Ash Removal and Disposal

Daily Ash Removal

Press the "OFF" button and allow the stove to complete the shut-down cycle and cool completely. Grasp the heat exchange cleaning rod located at the middle of the decorative room air grill and repeatedly pull it in and out until ash stops falling from the tubes into the firebox. Open the main door of the stove and use an old paint brush or putty knife to move ash from around the burnpot into the ash pan below. Use a long handled screwdriver or putty knife to remove any deposits left in the burnpot. Turn the ash pan latch counterclockwise until it releases and slide the ash pan out of the stove. Dump the ashes into a metal container and store them on a non-combustible surface to allow any embers to cool before disposal. Slide the ash pan back into the stove; rotate the latch clockwise, making certain it catches the lip above the ash pan opening.  The stove is now ready to resume normal operation.

 

Biweekly Ash Removal

Biweekly maintenance should include the steps listed in here AS WELL AS the steps listed above. Remove the baffle by grasping the baffle lifting the tab in the center of the baffle. Tilt the baffle towards the back of the stove and lift it up and out of its support holes in the firebox shelf. Allow the baffle to slide down to the cradle and tilt it down, pulling it out of the stove through the main door. The use of a utility vacuum is highly recommended because it will prevent fly-ash from falling through the exhaust holes and into the exhaust chamber. Ash Vacuum (Part # AC-AV). After removing all fly-ash from behind the baffle, reinsert the baffle into the stove, using the reverse of the process detailed above.

              

                                                                                         

Monthly Ash Removal

Monthly maintenance should include the steps listed in here AS WELL AS the steps listed above. The exhaust chamber of the stove was intentionally designed as an ash accumulation area.  Allowing ash to accumulate here prevents excess ash build-up in the combustion blower and the venting system. The exhaust chamber is accessed via the two clean-out ports located on the back wall of the firebox, near the bottom. Clean the exhaust chamber AFTER cleaning the firebox shelf and heat exchanger tubes, because cleaning them will deposit ash into the exhaust chamber. Use a 5/16” socket wrench to remove the two screws which hold each of the clean-out covers in place and remove the cleanout covers from the firebox. Using a utility type vacuum cleaner Ash Vacuum (Part # AC-AV) vacuum the fly ash out of the exhaust chamber. A short piece of hose can be attached to the end of the utility vacuum line and can be useful in reaching the ash which accumulates between the clean-out ports. Once all ash has been removed from the exhaust chamber, reinstall the cleanout port covers, using the screws previously removed.

               

                    (Impingement Plate)                                                            (Burn Pot Assembly)

Annual Cleaning

The stove and the flue system (Click Here for Flue Cleaning) should be given a complete cleaning at the end of the heating season. Remove the burn pot assembly, clean it thoroughly, and re-install it.  This will require new burn pot cradle gasket (Part # PU-CGEP). Be sure to tighten the set screws when you replace them, but do not over-tighten. In addition to the cleaning mentioned earlier, the Exhaust Blower should be removed annually and the blower tube vacuumed of any ash build up.  When cleaning or replacing the blower a new combustion blower gasket (Part # PU-CBMG) should be added between the blower flange and the steel exhaust tube. Soot and Fly ash: Formation and Need for Removal - The products of combustion will contain small particles of fly ash. The fly ash will collect in the exhaust venting system and restrict the flow of flue gases.  Incomplete combustion, such as occurs during startup, shutdown, or incorrect operation of the room heater will lead to some soot formation which will collect in the exhaust venting system. The exhaust venting system should be inspected at least once every year to determine if cleaning is necessary.

NOTE

There is also a small gasket between the blower motor and the blower housing, Replacement is not available.

DO NOT REMOVE THIS GASKET!

Evolution Pellet Troubleshooting Guide

(Click the links below for more information)

Evolution Pellet Stove

 

 

 

Parts List

25-PUF, 55-SHP240 or 55-TRP240

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
PU-HLUF Hopper Lid
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch
PU-HCUF Hopper Cover
PU-RAPTUF Rear Access Panel - Top
PU-RAPBUF Rear Access Panel - Bottom
CU-047042 2.4 RPM Auger Motor
PU-LSPUF Left Side Panel
PU-LCPUF Left Side Cover Plate
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3” adapter)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket
PU-CMG Combustion Motor Gasket
PU-AFUF Auger
PU-HFGUF Hopper Flange Gasket
PU-CH6 Igniter
PU-HOPUF Hopper
PU-HLG Hopper Lid Gasket
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch
PU-VH Vacuum Hose
PU-CB240-06 Digital Control Board
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower
PU-RSPUF Right Side Panel
PU-RCPUF Right Side Cover Plate
AC-GSC Glass Supports for CA-13C Door
AC-G10 9 1/4" x 14 3/4" Glass with Gasket
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
CA-13C Door
AC-DGKNC Door Gasket Kit
PU-APUF Ash Pan
PU-ADPUF Air Deflector Plate
PU-BPUF Burn Pot
CU-ADP Ash Dump Plug
CA-ATUF Auger Tube Assembly
CU-RG Rubber Gasket
PU-ATGUF Auger Tube Gasket
PU-GP Guide Plate
PU-PGB52 Exhaust Tube Gasket
CA-AMPP Auger Mounting Plate
CA-AC Auger Coupler
PU-HLS Hopper Lid Switch
PU-CBF6 6 AMP Control Board Fuse
AC-MBSP Hi-Temperature Black Paint

Options:

Part Number Description
PU-OAK Outside Air Kit
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat
AC-118 Brass Window Trim
AC-119 Brass Lip Trim
AC-03 Brass Knob for Ash Drawer

Diagnostic Test Mode

Units built from 2004 to present have a diagnostic test mode built into the circuit board.  This can be used to test the individual electrical components of the unit.

WARNING: This mode can not be used to operate the stove! Attempting to burn this unit in this mode can cause damage to the unit.



Note:  The stove should be completely empty of fuel and cold when using the diagnostic mode for testing the unit.
 


 

  

 

1) Unplug the stove. Locate the low burn air and air on temp buttons at the bottom of the touch pad. To start diagnostic, plug in the stove and then quickly push these buttons at the same time, then release

 

  A number code will appear in the digital readout, this is the reading for the heat sensor. The blower speed number may change some while displayed. This is normal.

 

2) At this point press the low burn air button  located at the bottom center of the touchpad. After pushing  a dash appears in each of the two display windows.

 

 

3) Press the  blower speed up arrow  , and release, the exhaust blower will come on and you should see a circle in the blower speed and a dash then appears in the heat range.

 

 4) Next, press the  blower speed down arrow  , this will turn on the room air blower and you will see in the display an 8 in the blower speed and the dash in the heat range

 

 5) Press the heat range up arrow  next, this will start the feed  auger motor, you will see an 8 in both displays at this time.

   6) The  low burn air button  at the bottom center of the control board will turn on the auto igniter element, and the red light above the button will light up when pressed, look  through the glass in the front door and watch for 2 to 3 minutes for the igniter to start to glow.
 
 

7) To turn off any of these components simply push again the same button that turned it on . To take the unit out of diagnostic mode, unplug the unit and plug it back in, this will reset the control board back into its "run mode".

Pellet Utility Furnace Troubleshooting Guide

25-PUF, 55-SHP240 or 55-TRP240

 

WARNING: To avoid electrical shock, always disconnect the unit before attempting any trouble shooting procedures (unless otherwise indicated in this manual). If the solution in this guide does not correct the problem, consult your local dealer or call the factory.

CAUTION: Label all wires prior to disconnection when servicing controls. Wiring errors can cause improper and dangerous operation and Verify  proper operation after servicing.

Unit must be OFF, unplugged and cool before any maintenance

 

 

Problem Cause Solution
1. Auger not turning 1. Bad gear motor
2. Foreign matter in auger
3. Vacuum sensor
1. Replace auger motor
2. Remove pellets and object
3. Check exhaust blower
2. Smoke smell or dust in house    Improper exhaust
    connection
   Check all connections for leaks
     especially the exhaust blower
     connection; Seal with silicone,
     hose clamp or aluminum tape
3. Room air blower not operating 1. Loose sensor
2. High "ON" temperature
3. Blower Speed to High for
    Heat Range causing blower
    to cycle
1. Tighten connection on sensor
2. Adjust temperature lower
3. Lower Blower Speed
4. Exhaust blower not operating 1. Loose connection
2. Bad blower
3. Bad vacuum sensor
1. Check connection at c/board
2. Replace blower
3. Replace vacuum sensor
5. Lazy fire 1. Control board settings
2. Bad exhaust blower
3. Excessive pellet  moisture
4. Excessive ash
5. Low quality pellets
1. Review board settings
2. Replace blower
3. Keep pellets inside
4. Remove baffles; Clean unit
5. Use premium pellets
6. Blown fuse (6 AMP) 1. Power surge

2. Exposed wire

3. Electric motor shorting
    or bound up

1. Replace fuse; use surge protector


2. Check for exposed or frayed
    wire and loose connections


3. Check motors and blowers
    bound up for obstructions or
    lock-up

7. High pellet consumption 1. Low quality pellets
2. Board out of adjustment
1. Use premium pellets
2. Check control board settings
8. Squeaking noise 1. Build-up in tube
2. Improper auger alignment
3. Blower noise
1. Remove auger and clean
2. Re-align auger
3. Remove and oil blower
9. Pinging or rattling noise 1. Foreign material
2. Loose set screw
1. Check blower for material
2. Check impeller blower screw
10. Unit shuts down in
       20 to 30 minutes
      (E-2 code on control board)
1. Loose Heat Sensor
2. Control Board Settings

3. Failure to start (E-2)

1. Check stove connection.
2. Check settings, always start unit
    on "5" to "9" setting.
3. Check igniter for buildup or failure.
11. Unit keeps shutting down
      ("E" codes on control board)
1. Blocked flue (E-4)

2. Blower failure (E-2)

3. Improper installation* (E-4)
1. Check for flue blockage (nests,
    rodents, excess soot, etc.)
2. Check combustion blower
    wires, then call Customer Service.
3. Check for loose flue/pipe
    connections. Also be sure to have
    proper Outside Air hook-up.
12. "E-4" codes on control
       board.
1. Hopper lid was left open
    when refueling

2. Door left open or ajar

3. Component Failure

4. Out of fuel

5. E-4 may result for blower
    speed being set too high
1. You must not leave the lid open
     longer than 1 minute. The safety
     shut down switch turns the feed
     auger off when you open the
     hopper lid. Always make sure the
     hopper lid is shut and latched
     when your unit is heating.
2. Always make sure the door is
    closed and latched while your
    unit is running.
3. If you have an auger motor or
    exhaust blower fail you will get an
    E-4 code.
4. If your unit runs out of fuel you will
    get an E-4 code.
5. The heat range is set on 1 and the
    blower speed is set to 9.

*Improper installation may cause a back draft.

Note: Also check for loose or cracked vacuum hose on vacuum switches (see Parts Diagram).

Note: Negative pressure in a home is a serious issue. This unit must be installed with the Outside Air Kit (Part # PU-OAK).

25-PUF, 55-SHP240 or 55-TRP240 Troubleshooting

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PI, 55-SHP20, and 55-TRP20

25-PI, 55-SHP20
or 55-TRP20

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-114 Brass Louvers (#26 on diagram)
(2001 and later Models; for earlier models order part # AC-112 louvers)
AC-114BN Nickel Louvers (#26 on diagram) (Call 800-245-6489 for price and availability)
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-SHN Nickel Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
AC-MBSP Hi-Temperature Black Paint
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2000 or before
PU-ABGN Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2001 or later
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
(2002 and later Models; for earlier models order part # PU-4C442)
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WPA Burn Pot Wear Plate  (#5A  on diagram)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar
PU-CB04 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (# 24 on diagram)
PU-VS-A Second Vacuum Switch (see Control Board diagram)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket (#10 on diagram)
PU-BPG Burn Pot Gasket (#6 on diagram)
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)
PU-HLG Hopper Lid Gasket (#22 on diagram)
PU-CH Cartridge Heater (Igniter) Assembly (#27 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
PU-OAK Outside Air Kit
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3100 4" Pellet Vent Kit (For High Altitudes - 4000+ ft.)
GU-1E30-914GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
AC-103BN Brushed Nickel Lip Trim for Ash Apron
AC-104 Brass Lip & Backplate Trim
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-106-PBN Brushed Nickel Window Trim

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PDV(E), 55-SHP22, 55-TRP22, or American Heritage

25-PDV(E),
55-SHP22,
55-TRP22,
or American Heritage

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-114 Brass Louvers (#26 on diagram)
(2001 and later Models;  for earlier models call order part # AC-112 louvers)
AC-114BN Nickel Louvers (#26 on diagram) (Call 800-245-6489 for price and availability)
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-SHN Nickel Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
AC-MBSP Hi-Temperature Black Paint
PU-ABGN Auger Bearing Gasket
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WPA Burn Pot Wear Plate  (#5A  on diagram)
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
(2002 and later Models; for earlier models order PU-4C442)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft (#14 on diagram)
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft (#14 on diagram)
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch
(#25 on diagram) (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing (#16 on diagram)
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar (#17 on diagram)
PU-CB04 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (see Control Board diagram)
PU-VS-A Second Vacuum Switch (see Control Board diagram)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket (#10 on diagram)
PU-BPG Burn Pot Gasket (#6 on diagram)
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2000 or before
PU-ABGN Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2001 or later
PU-HLG

Hopper Lid Gasket (#22 on diagram)

PU-CH Cartridge Heater (Igniter) Assembly (#27 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
PU-OAK Outside Air Kit
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3100 4" Pellet Vent Kit (For High Altitudes - 4000+ ft.)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
AC-103BN Brushed Nickel Lip Trim for Ash Apron
AC-106-PBN Brushed Nickel Window Trim

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PDVC, 55-SHP10, 55-SHP10L, American Standard or 55-TRP10

25-PDVC,
55-SHP10,
55-SHP10L,
American Standard
or 55-TRP10

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-SHN Nickel Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
AC-MBSP Hi-Temperature Black Paint
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C442 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft (#14 on diagram)
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft (#14 on diagram)
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch
(#25 on diagram) (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing (#16 on diagram)
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar (#17 on diagram)
PU-CB04 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (see Control Board diagram)
PU-VS-A Second Vacuum Switch (see Control Board diagram)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket (#10 on diagram)
PU-BPG Burn Pot Gasket (#6 on diagram)
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2000 or before
PU-ABGN Auger Bearing Gasket (#15 on diagram)    Used on stoves manufactured 2001 or later
PU-HLG

Hopper Lid Gasket (#22 on diagram)

PU-CH Cartridge Heater (Igniter) Assembly (#27 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
PU-OAK Outside Air Kit
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3100 4" Pellet Vent Kit (For High Altitudes - 4000+ ft.)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
AC-103BN Brushed Nickel Lip Trim for Ash Apron
AC-106-PBN Brushed Nickel Window Trim

Diagnostic Test Mode

Units built from 2004 to present have a diagnostic test mode built into the circuit board.  This can be used to test the individual electrical components of the unit.

WARNING: This mode can not be used to operate the stove! Attempting to burn this unit in this mode can cause damage to the unit.



Note:  The stove should be completely empty of fuel and cold when using the diagnostic mode for testing the unit.
 


 

  

 

1) Unplug the stove. Locate the low burn air and air on temp buttons at the bottom of the touch pad. To start diagnostic, plug in the stove and then quickly push these buttons at the same time, then release

 

  A number code will appear in the digital readout, this is the reading for the heat sensor. The blower speed number may change some while displayed. This is normal.

 

2) At this point press the low burn air button  located at the bottom center of the touchpad. After pushing, a dash appears in the blower speed window.

 

 

3) Press the  blower speed up arrow  , and release, the exhaust blower will come on and you should see a circle in the blower speed and a dash then appears in the heat range.

 

 4) Next, press the  blower speed down arrow  , this will turn on the room air blower and you will see in the display an 8 in the blower speed and the dash in the heat range

 5) Press the heat range down arrow  this will turn on the lower auger motor, you will see a circle  in the heat range and an 8 in the blower speed.

 

 6) Press the heat range up arrow  next, this will start the auger motor, you will see an 8 in both displays at this time.

   7) The  low burn air button  at the bottom center of the control board will turn on the auto igniter element, and the red light above the button will light up when pressed, look  through the glass in the front door and watch for 2 to 3 minutes for the igniter to start to glow.
 
 

8) To turn off any of these components simply push again the same button that turned it on . To take the unit out of diagnostic mode, unplug the unit and plug it back in, this will reset the control board back into its "run mode".

E-4 (Time and Temperature Fault Code)

This is a "time and temperature" fault code: This code is only found in certain models. Essentially, it is caused when the unit drops a certain amount of temperature in a short amount of time, and its purpose is to take away the possibility of feeding fuel into a smoldering condition after a gap in feeding.

Common causes for E-4 codes:

1. Pellets bridging in the hopper: In some cases, pellets can form a self-supporting dome or “bridge” over the feed auger in the bottom of the hopper. When this happens, the feed auger empties out beneath the bridge and a gap in feeding occurs. This bridge will normally collapse under its own weight (along with natural vibrations from the unit) and feeding will resume. If the gap in feeding is long enough, the resulting loss of fuel and the dying fire can cause an E-4 code. Longer pellets are usually more susceptible to this issue, and excessive pellet dust can also cause this situation.

2. Stove shutting down from lack of fuel in a cool environment: Stoves such as the utility furnace are often used in shop or basement applications. In these applications, the ambient temperatures may be lower than in a ground-floor house type of application, so in a shutdown from running out of fuel, the E-4 can occur, as the temperature drop is more rapid. This does not denote a “failure” in the unit, but is a common occurrence in cold room shutdowns.

3. Gaps in feeding due to “hot fueling” or “hot cleaning”: For pellet units which have hopper lid switches and active door switches - when either is opened, they will stop feeding, and if the gap in feeding is too great then the E-4 "time and temp." error can occur.

E-3 (Over Temperature Limit)

This unit has the ability to moderate itself should the unit attain too high a temperature.  In some cases the unit will display an E-3 and go into a cool down sequence, in other cases the top auger will be interrupted until the unit has cooled enough that it deems itself safe to continue running. 

Common causes for E-3 codes (check these; more information is below this):

1. Dirty stove: As ash builds in the unit, it slows down the flow of air through it; this allows more heat to build in the unit before the exhaust leaves the stove.

2. Plugged or inoperable room fan: The room fan (or convection blower) has a dual purpose. One is to blow heat out into the room, the other is to help keep the stove cool internally, by blowing room temperature air through the unit, which scrubs heat out of the stove and pushes it out the front of the unit. Over time, these fans tend to attract “dust bunnies” and especially pet hair. This debris clogs the inlet screens on the large units and builds up on the blades of the smaller ones; in both cases it reduces the airflow through the stove, which allows the internal temperatures to rise slowly until the unit exceeds the high limit and errors out. A bad room fan will rapidly allow the unit to reach overtemp and shut down, as well.

3. Running the blower speed below the heat range: If the blower does not move enough air for the heat that the fire is making, the unit will error out as well.

4. Burning the wrong fuel in the stove: Pellet stoves are not “multifuel” stoves; they are designed to only burn wood pellets. Burning corn, grains, cherry pits, switch grass, or other fuels can result in higher temperatures and can damage the stove, as well as cause error codes.

MORE Information Concerning E-2 Codes:
 

A.

Smaller pellets can feed through the system faster than normal-sized ones (about 1" long on average is a normal size for pellets). This happens because the smaller the pellets are, the more they will settle into the top auger at a time, which causes the unit to feed more fuel than normal in each feed setting.
 

B.

Running heat range higher than blower speed: The room air blower not only blows the heat into the room, but as it is doing so it also provides a cooling function to the unit internally. As room air is blown through the unit, it removes heat from it, thereby cooling the unit down. If not enough room air is moved through the unit, the heat then builds up inside the unit until over temp limit is reached.

Note: this can cause damage to the unit if allowed to happen frequently.

E-2 (Failure to Start)

Failure to start: Auto-ignition equipped stove models (units produced in 2004 and newer) monitor themselves during the "SU" sequence (Startup) when the stove is being put into use. If the unit does not reach its minimum operating temperature within the 20 minute startup period, it will shut down and display the "E-2" code. Should this occur, and the fire does not physically light, the fuel that fed through during the startup attempt should be removed from the burn pot, the burn pot area should be cleaned (if it was not cleaned prior to attempted start) and another start should be attempted. If the unit subsequently does not start on the second attempt, the following should be checked:

Common causes for E-2 codes (check these; more information is below this):

1. Igniter plugged with ash: To clear, vacuum out the burn pot, then insert a toothpick (or a straightened-out paperclip or similar item) into the igniter hole and “ream out” the airspace between the tip of the igniter rod and the backside of the hole. This will allow the heated air to pass through into the firepot, to more readily start the fire on time.

2. Igniter out of position: The igniter must have a standoff, which allows air to pass the tip to light the pellets. If the igniter rod is positioned too close to the hole into the pot, the air cannot get past the tip to light the pellets. Adjusting the igniter back to allow for a larger air gap should correct the problem.

3. If the unit fires but does not continue to run with ample heat to be able to make its proof of fire temp.: The likely issue is a disconnected heat sensor, or the “air on temp” setting being too high. To check the air on temp, push that button and look in the blower speed readout for the setting. It must be set on 1; if set higher, reset to 1 and re-attempt to start the unit. If the stove still doesn’t make it out of startup (particularly if the room fan does not come on), check the heat sensor for possible bad connection. If connected correctly, test the sensor in diagnostic; if the sensor reads a "9" in the heat range and it is connected properly, it’s bad and should be replaced.  

MORE Information Concerning E-2 Codes:

  • The cartridge heater itself, when energized, will start to glow within two to three minutes of turning the unit on. If the cartridge heater does not glow, the cartridge heater itself and its connections to the control board would need to be checked.

  • The burn area and the chamber beneath the wear plate should be completely clean. Ash that is left in the burn area from previous fires can retard airflow that is essential for a clean start.

Pay particular attention to the igniter opening to the right of the auger.  Ignition is caused by the free flow of combustion air through the chamber which houses the cartridge heater; this air is then superheated as it passes through this chamber out into the burn pot.  If this flow of air is restricted, the amount of heated air needed to light the pellets will not be present and the pellets will either not light at all or will take too long to ignite, and the unit will not have sufficient time to reach its operating temperature. To ensure that the airway is clear, it may be necessary to occasionally insert a toothpick or similar implement into the igniter hole and break up the ash that would be causing the obstruction.

This should only be performed when stove is completely cold! After breaking up the obstruction, use an ash vacuum or shop vac to remove the loosened ash from the igniter hole and, after ensuring the unit is otherwise cleaned and ready for service, attempt another start.

  • When starting the unit, there is no need to place any fuel into the burn pot before lighting; the unit will allow itself enough fuel to sufficiently start. If the unit does not feed any fuel into the burn pot, there will be no fire and an E-2 code should appear. Should this be the case, inspect the auger system itself to ensure that the augers are working correctly; if they are, also ensure that the fuel is not getting hung up in the hopper.
  • Wet fuel can severely retard the ignition process. Pellet fuel should be stored in a dry, climate controlled area, as the fuel can soak up excessive moisture; therefore, pellet bags should not be opened until fuel is needed.
  • The position of the cartridge heater in its chamber can effect lighting as well. If the cartridge heater is not properly centered on the hole in the burn pot, or if its depth back into that hole is not correct, it can have the effect of blocking the opening with its own tip, restricting airflow. Also, if it is not centered, airflow would not effectively surround it before reaching the fuel, causing inconsistent starting.

Other things that can cause a failure to start include:

  • Non functional exhaust blower: This would give an E-2, followed by an E-1 as stated above.  

  • Top or bottom auger motor not running: No fuel flow would result in a fail to start. 

  • A non functional or disconnected heat sensor: If the unit does not read sufficient heat within the startup sequence, it will assume that the unit did not start and give an E-2 code.  This can happen with a bad heat sensor, even if the unit starts normally and does get hot, and a mis-programmed "air on temp" setting; must be on 1.

E-1 (Vacuum Loss)

Pellet stoves require a clean "un-resisted" flow of combustion air to perform safely and efficiently. The E-1 code is for vacuum loss; it happens when the flow of exhaust is not sufficient to hold the “flue blockage” switch closed.

Common causes for E-1 codes

1. Exhaust blower not coming on when stove is turned on. If not, check the blower itself and its wires.


2. Blocked flue pipe: check the flue pipe for obstruction and clean.


3. Cracked vacuum hose connection at the exhaust housing: this hose can crack if the stove has been run hot and/or has not been cleaned as much as it should be.


4. Loose wiring connection: on the switch and the other ends where they connect at the bottom of the control board.


5. Issue after component replacement: If any associated component such as the vacuum switch has been replaced, ensure that the replacement component has been wired correctly in the “normally open” position, and that the vacuum hose is connected to the “negative” port (the lower, off-white colored connector).

If everything mentioned above is as it should be the, Vacuum Switch itself is bad and should be replaced.

MORE Information Concerning E-1 Codes:

  • The exhaust setup should be done in such a way as to keep the horizontal length to a minimum, too long a horizontal run will slow the air flow down to a point where vacuum loss can occur.  This is caused by a lack of natural convective rise in the horizontal section, which means that the exhaust blower has to physically move this exhaust without the help of this natural rise.  Two to three ft. of horizontal will generally work. As for the vertical portion of the installation: it is mandatory that the vertical must be at least 3' but it can be run higher.  In this case, if the installation will require more than 15 ft. of total pipe for the exhaust run, the pipe diameter should be increased to a 4" diameter. See Installation Page

  • The unit is designed to handle a standard through the wall pipe kit which contains two 90 degree elbows. One elbow is a "clean out tee," which is placed at the bottom of the vertical stack to allow ease in cleaning of the flue pipe itself, and the other is generally placed at the top of the vertical (to turn the flow of exhaust away from the structure if the flue is not being run above the roofline), before attaching the horizontal cap.  Additional 90 degree elbows to this system can add resistance, or back pressure, to the flow of exhaust which could compromise the free flow of air needed for proper function.  For "catty corner" installations, an additional elbow is used.  This elbow would be a 45 degree and would provide much less resistance; therefore, addition of this piece would generally not compromise airflow.
  • An Outside Intake Air Source is Mandatory with all freestanding England's Stove Works' pellet units!  As stated above, the free flow of air through these units is extremely important to ensure proper function.  Virtually any structure into which a pellet stove would be installed will not have enough draftiness built into it to allow for the amount of air to leak back into the structure at the rate a pellet stove will remove it. The size of the structure is not a factor in this; therefore, a buildup of "negative pressure" will occur as air is removed from the structure.  This buildup would then restrict the free flow of combustion air through the unit and will cause a loss of vacuum.  Improper installation of the outside air intake can also cause vacuum loss; the unit is designed to be connected to a 2" intake pipe, which should be installed in as short and direct a manner as possible.  This pipe would have to be less than 6 ft. in length and may not contain more than two 90 degree elbows.  If these parameters cannot be met, the diameter of the intake must be increased to a 3" pipe for the entire length of the intake run.  Basement installations would have to be done in this manner. ( See Basement Installation Page)

    The intake pipe should be equipped with a screen to keep any animals, bees or foreign material from getting into the intake, but the screen used should not be restrictive in its makeup, and should be installed above the snow drift line in areas where this could be a problem.

  • Vacuum loss can occur at higher elevations due to the air being thinner. Installations above 4,000 ft. above sea level should be done using a 4" pellet vent pipe rather than 3", and intake should also be done in 3" in most cases.

  • Failure to properly clean and maintain the unit can cause loss of vacuum to occur. Proper airflow will not be attained if the unit is not cleaned out regularly. Areas that must stay clear are:

    1. The firepot itself, especially the area under the wear plate, must not be allowed to become blocked. This area should be cleaned out at a minimum every few days, or daily if the unit is being run on higher heat ranges.
       

    2. The impingement plate (or baffle plate) should be removed weekly and all areas behind it should be thoroughly cleaned.
       

    3. The heat exchangers, which can be accessed when baffle plate is removed, should also be thoroughly cleaned.   (See Cleaning Page)

    4. The flue itself (the pellet vent pipe) should be cleaned monthly or after every ton of pellets (whichever comes first).

    5. The entire stove and flue system should be fully cleaned and serviced annually. Failures due to neglect in cleaning or maintenance will not be covered under warranty!

    6. It is recommended that an ash removal system be utilized to perform cleaning on these units; contact your hearth retailer or England's Stove Works to obtain such a system.

    7. Using alternative fuels such as dried corn or cherry pits, which tend to feed faster, have different burning characteristics and BTU outputs. These fuels tend to burn hotter, and in the case of corn, the kernels burn slower than pellets do, so they can build up in the firepot and cause the fire to become hotter than it is supposed to. NOTE: Our pellet stoves are designed for wood pellets only.

  • Other possible causes for E-1 would include: non-functional exhaust blower; a loose wire from the flue blockage vacuum switch to the control board (these wires connect to the control board near the bottom of the board); a loose hose connection from the flue blockage vacuum switch to the exhaust chamber; or a blocked connection where the hose connects to the exhaust chamber. Also, an improperly positioned baffle plate, which would allow exhaust to bypass the top of the heat exchanger ... i.e., if the baffle plate is not positioned flat against the back wall of the firebox at the bottom, allowing the fire to get behind it (this would cause higher exhaust temperatures that could damage the vacuum hose or cause vacuum loss due to lack of air density (the hotter air gets, the less dense it becomes, making it much harder to sustain vacuum pressure)).

Fuel Feed Related Problems

All England's stove works pellet units use a two auger feed system. This system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The upper auger located at the bottom of the hopper runs intermittently. The lower auger which brings the pellets from the upper auger to the fire runs continuously.

Each of the augers is independently run by a motor and gearbox assembly. These motors are identical and interchangeable. Feed related issues fall under two categories; bottom auger stopped, or bottom auger turning but no fuel is being fed.

Lower auger not turning

If the lower  auger is not turning the following should be checked:

  1. Is the auger physically jammed? Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets.
  2. Is the motor getting power? If the motor is getting power it will get fairly hot quickly. If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. If the motor is not getting power, either the motor's wires or the control board are bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a loose setscrew holding the motor to the auger, or a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger  motor must be replaced.

The lower auger is turning but no fuel is coming out

If this is the case, the first thing that should be done is the hopper should be emptied. Check the auger itself to see if it is physically jammed as foreign objects in pellets could jam the auger. If the auger is free the next step would be to determine if the motor is receiving power. The motor will get warm if it is getting power within a few minutes. If the motor is getting power and is not running the motor is bad. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. the wires from the top auger motor are connected on terminals 3 and 4 on the control board from left to right).

Another possibility could be the over temperature limit protection in the control board. This will stop the top auger if the unit reads as being too hot, the auger will start moving again if the unit cools to an acceptable temperature however and generally will continue to operate.

(The vacuum switch to the left in this picture is wired through the top auger motor.)

Note: The model shown in the picture is the model 25-pdvc/55shp10/55trp10. In models 25-pdv/55-shp22 /55-trp22, and models 25-pi/ 55-shp20/ 55-trp20 the vacuum switch wired through the top auger circuit is located forward in the back of the stove beneath the room air blower.

Vacuum related stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch present in newer model pellet units is wired through the top auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.


Useful Links

Wiring Page

Feed Rate/Thermostat Problems

Auger Alignment

Dry Run Instructions

To ensure proper operation of the pellet unit before placing the unit into normal use, a "Dry Run" checkout should be performed.

Press the "ON" button to begin the dry run.

The control board will display number settings in the display window for several seconds then the letters "S-U" will appear. the unit will begin functioning at this time. While the unit is running ,observe the following: the exhaust blower should be running, the bottom auger (appearing in the firebox) should be running continuously, and the top auger (in the hopper) should run for a few seconds then stop for several seconds and repeat this cycle as the unit runs, after a few minutes time , the igniter element should start to glow visibly in a hole in the back right of the burn pot.

After the 20 minute dry run, the control board will return to "OFF." An error code will appear in the Heat Range and the Blower Speed windows as "E-2", which means the unit failed to start normally.   Note: if the room temperature is warmer than 75 degrees when this test is run, the stove may not give an "E-2" as  but will go into shutdown after an additional several minutes. if this happens it is also an acceptable result for the dry run.

After this code is received and you are sure the unit is working properly, the unit may be fueled and placed into operation.

Lighting the Unit

Auto-Start procedure

Caution - Never use gasoline, lantern fuel, charcoal lighter fluid, diesel fuel, or any other flammable liquid to start the fire. Use of flammable liquid with this unit can be dangerous and may damage the unit, voiding the warranty.

Start-Up

When the "ON" button is pressed from a cold start, the unit is in "Start-Up" (after 3 seconds, there will be an "S U" in the Heat Range and Blower Speed windows to verify this).

While in this mode, the unit has a preset heat range and will remain in this mode for 20 minutes to prevent the unit from over-firing. During this start-up period you can set the Control Board at the setting you desire; after the start-up is complete, the unit will run at the user setting. If for some reason the unit does not come on after pressing the "ON" button, the power cord can be disconnected for approximately three minutes. After this time, the Control Board can be re-connected to the power source and you may press the "ON" button again.

First fire

Note: The operation of this unit should be checked (dry run) prior to this procedure.

Click here for Dry Run Instructions

Click here for Settings

 

Adjust the "Heat Range" to a "5" setting and allow the stove to burn in this manner for at least three (3) hours.

This will allow the unit to "cure out" as the paint and the oils from the manufacturing process burn off. We recommend you open doors and windows in your dwelling during this process. Subsequent Cold Starts: In a cold start situation, the unit should be operated at a "5" setting until the room air blower begins to operate.

Click here for Shutdown Instructions

NOTE: The start-up cycle for  the Auto-Start Igniter is 13 minutes. The startup mode for the unit will last 20 minutes

Press the "ON" button only once on start-up. Pressing the "ON" button a second time during the start-up cycle will cause the start-up cycle to begin again.

If the unit does not start after repeated attempts, the unit can be manually started with an approved for pellet stove starter material such as gel or wood chips.

Click here for Manual Lighting Instructions

Loading Fuel (Cold Stove)

Note: These units are designed to burn hardwood pellets. Use of other fuels is  not recommended.

When loading the unit, open the two hopper lid latches if the unit is a freestanding unit , if it is an insert , simply lift the hopper lid off and set aside.

Open the hopper lid, and pour in the desired amount of fuel. It is important that the hopper is not overfilled with fuel as the stove must be run with the hopper lid closed and latched.

After pouring in the pellets, ensure that no pellets or other matter is left on the gasket around the top of the hopper, then latch the lid down securely or in the case of the insert, place the lid back in position. At this point the if the unit is cleaned out it is ready for use.

Refilling the Hopper

Always press the "OFF" touch pad before refueling. This unit has a 40 to 60 lb. hopper, and should be refilled when the hopper level drops to three or four inches.


WARNING

Do not operate this unit with the hopper lid open or unsecured.

NEVER place your hand near the auger while the stove is operating.

Note: The hopper lid will be warm; therefore, you should always use some type of hand protection.  

Note: Always ensure that all pellet matter is cleared from the hopper lid gasket before closing. Be sure to close and latch hopper securely before re-firing.

Proceed to Lighting the Unit

Parts Guide

Select your Model Number

 

25-PDVC,
55-SHP10,
55-SHP10L,
American Standard
or 55-TRP10
25-PDV(E),
55-SHP22,
55-TRP22,
or American Heritage
25-PI, 55-SHP20
or 55-TRP20

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PAF, 55-SHP25 and 55-TRP25

       25-PAF,        55-SHP25
or 55-TRP25

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002 Combustion (Exhaust) Blower
BM-1376 850 CFM Convection (Room Air) Blower
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WP Burn Pot Wear Plate
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar

Options:

Part Number Description
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PI, 55-SHP20, and 55-TRP20

25-PI, 55-SHP20
or 55-TRP20

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-114 Brass Louvers (#26 on diagram)
(2001 and later Models; for earlier models order part # AC-112 louvers)
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-SHN Nickel Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
(2002 and later Models; for earlier models order part # PU-4C442)
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (# 24 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
GU-1E30-914

Wall Thermostat

AC-104 Brass Lip & Backplate Trim

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PDVP, 55-SHP15, 55-TRP15, and US-25-5670

25-PDVP,
55-SHP15,
55-TRP15,
or US 25-5670

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-114 Brass Louvers (#26 on diagram)
(2001 and later Models; for earlier models order part # AC-112 louvers)
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
(2002 and later Models; for earlier models order part # PU-4C442)
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WP Burn Pot Wear Plate
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (# 24 on diagram)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket (#10 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PDV, 55-SHP22, and 55-TRP22 (Pre 2004)

25-PDV(E),
55-SHP22,
55-TRP22,
or American Heritage

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-114 Brass Louvers (#26 on diagram)
(2001 and later Models; for earlier models order part # AC-112 louvers)
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
PU-ABG Auger Bearing Gasket
PU-AMS Auger Motor Support Gasket
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002B Combustion (Exhaust) Blower (includes 3" adapter)(#'s 8 and 9 on diagram)
PU-4C447 Convection (Room Air) Blower (#13 on diagram)
(2002 and later Models; for earlier models order part # PU-4C442)
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WP Burn Pot Wear Plate
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board (#12 on diagram)
PU-VS Vacuum Shut-Down Switch (# 24 on diagram)
PU-CBG Combustion Blower Gasket (#10 on diagram)

Options:

Part Number Description
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat

Parts List for Model Numbers 25-PDVC, 55-SHP10, and 55-TRP10 (Pre 2004)

25-PDVC,
55-SHP10,
55-SHP10L,
American Standard
or 55-TRP10

 

Replacement Parts:

 

Part Number Description
AC-GGK Glass Gasket Kit (gasket only, no glass)
AC-DGKC Door Gasket Kit
AC-G9 9" x 9" Glass with Gasket
AC-SH Brass Door Spring Handle
AC-MCSP Hi-Temperature Charcoal Paint
PU-047040 1 RPM Auger Motor Assembly
PU-076002 Combustion (Exhaust) Blower
BM-1376 850 CFM Convection (Room Air) Blower
PU-BP98 Burn Pot Assembly
PU-BP98WP Burn Pot Wear Plate
PU-CB98 Digital Control Board
PU-62-40-151-3 Hopper Lid Latch (2002 and later Models;  for earlier models order PU-103-50)
PU-AF6T Top Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-AF11B Bottom Auger Shaft W/Flighting
PU-UCF204-12 Auger Bearing
PU-2X570 3/4" Locking Collar

Options:

Part Number Description
AC-3000 3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)3" Pellet Vent Kit (Through-the-Wall)
AC-3001 Remote Thermostat
AC-106-P/SH-106-P Brass Window Trim
AC-103 Brass Lip Trim for Ash Apron
(2001 and later Models;   for earlier models, order part # AC-101-PU.)
GU-1E30-914 Wall Thermostat

E-Codes

(Click on an E-Code below for more information)

E-1 (Vacuum Loss)

E-2 (Failure to Start)

E-3 (Over Temperature Limit)

E-4 (Time and Temperature Fault Code)


 

Feed Rate /Thermostat Problems

The thermostat circuit that works with the control board is a simple "contact/no contact" circuit. This means that when the thermostat is calling for heat, the circuit is closed, and when the thermostat is not calling for heat , the circuit is open.

Located on the back of the control board , at the bottom right corner of the circuit board, is the connection for the thermostat. Our units and replacement control boards come from the factory with a "shorting wire" installed which makes a closed circuit across the thermostat connections. this shorting wire must be installed for the unit to run without a thermostat, and is removed only when installing a thermostat

(Thermostat connection with shorting wire on circuit board)

This also makes thermostat problems easy to identify, the basic problems you may see with thermostats are as follows:

  1. Wrong type thermostat for the stove, the system our control boards use requires that the thermostat be of a certain type. It must be a "non-anticipated millivolt" or a 24 volt that is millivolt capable. Most thermostats that are used for gas units are of this type.
  2. Thermostat not leveled. wall thermostats of the type used on our units are "mercury switch" type this type of switch must be properly leveled when installed or adjusted to level the contact switch for proper operation, if the thermostat is not leveled the unit may either run for heat all the time, or run on its "low burn" all the time.
  3. Broken wire/wrong size wire. most thermostat's instructions will tell you what gauge (size) wire must be used for the length of the run required. using the wrong type of wire can cause improper function, usually causing the unit to run on low burn all the time. also, a broken wire or bad connection either at the thermostat or at the stove will make the unit run on low burn all the time

(Wall Thermostat)

Flue Cleaning

Pellet units work at their best when a clean flow of air is maintained, therefore the flue system should be cleaned regularly. Most installations will include a "Clean Out Tee" (p/n  AC-3067). This component allows for the vent to be cleaned without having to disconnect the vent system from the stove. the vent system should be cleaned periodically throughout the burning season. the frequency of cleaning can vary due to the amount of usage the unit gets, a good idea would be to check the flue system cleanout after running the first ton (50 bags) of fuel through the stove, and gauge from what is found as to how long to go between cleanings. The stove and the fuel themselves can be a good indicator that  the flue system is in need of cleaning, the following symptoms are possible indicators.


1. The glass sooting up more rapidly than usual,
2. The stove producing more smoke from the exhaust than usual, and
3. The ash produced in the unit will generally be a darker color than usual when the flue is restricted.
At least annually the flue should be swept out. Aftermarket brushes and flexible rods for this purpose should be available from your local hearth retailer.

Cleaning

Daily Ash Maintenance

Press the "OFF" touch pad and allow the stove to burn for five (5) minutes prior to opening the door. A long-handled screwdriver or long-handled putty knife can be used to scrape off any build-up or crust in the burn pot area. This can then be pushed to the left or right into the ash storage area.

Weekly Ash Removal

Shut the stove down by pressing the "OFF" touch pad and allowing the unit to go through the complete shut down cycle. Allow the unit to completely cool down and then remove the ashes with a scoop or an Ash Vacuum (Part # AC-AV) The ashes should be placed in a non-combustible container with an airtight lid and should always be placed on a non-combustible surface or on the ground until completely cooled and free of hot cinders. Once the ashes are removed, the burn pot should be given a complete inspection. Remove the Burn Pot Wear Plate and check for any build-up in the front of the burn area. Clean out all air holes - if necessary, a 1/8" drill bit can be used to perform this task. These air holes should be kept clean, as they supply combustion air under and around the pellet fuel.

              

                        (Burn Pot)                                                                       (Wear Plate)

Monthly Ash Removal

The large baffle plate  or "Impingement Plate" positioned above and behind the burn pot should be removed monthly. This can be done by lifting up the plate and pulling it out. The area behind the plate should then be cleaned thoroughly, and the plate placed back in the original position. The Burn Pot Assembly should also be thoroughly cleaned, and the wear plate should be removed and cleaned. Before replacing the wear plate, clean the burn box thoroughly.

               

                    (Impingement Plate)                                                            (Burn Pot Assembly)

Annual Cleaning

The stove and the flue system (Click Here for Flue Cleaning) should be given a complete cleaning at the end of the heating season.  Remove the burn pot assembly, clean it thoroughly, and re-install it.  This will require new burn pot gasket (Part # PU-BPG). Be sure to tighten the set screws when you replace them, but do not over-tighten. In addition to the cleaning mentioned earlier, the Exhaust Blower should be removed annually and the blower tube vacuumed of any ash build up.  When cleaning or replacing the blower a new combustion blower  gasket (Part # PU-CBG) should be added between the blower flange and the steel exhaust tube. Soot and Fly ash: Formation and Need for Removal - The products of combustion will contain small particles of fly ash. The fly ash will collect in the exhaust venting system and restrict the flow of flue gases.  Incomplete combustion, such as occurs during startup, shutdown, or incorrect operation of the room heater will lead to some soot formation which will collect in the exhaust venting system. The exhaust venting system should be inspected at least once every year to determine if cleaning is necessary.

NOTE

There is also a small gasket between the blower motor and the blower housing, Replacement is not available.

DO NOT REMOVE THIS GASKET!

Gasket Maintenance

One of the biggest keys to getting peak performance from your pellet unit is gasket maintenance. Our pellet units are designed to pull combustion air in through the fire and eject the exhaust out through the vent pipe.

The gaskets which seal around the window (AC-GGK), the door (AC-DGKC) and the hopper lid (PU-HLG) ensure that the air that is pulled through the stove is not pulled through these areas. Air that enters through leaky gaskets is air that does not pass through the fire,  leading to  incomplete burning of the fuel and diminished performance.

Some gaskets are only going to need replacing when the component they are sealing is removed. these would include the burn pot gasket (PU-BPG), the combustion blower gasket (PU-CBG), and the auger bearing gaskets (PU-ABG).

Examples of Worn Gaskets

  

 (This gasket should be replaced)                              (Frayed strings can be trimmed but

                                                                                   this gasket should be replaced soon.)


Replacement Gaskets - Visit your model's page at store.heatredefined.com to see the replacement gaskets for your stove

Examples:

"AC-GGK"

Window Glass Gasket Kit

"AC-DGKC"

Door Gasket Kit

"PU-HLG"

Hopper Lid Gasket

"PU-BPG"

Burn Pot Gasket

        "PU-CBG"            Combustion Blower Gasket

"PU-ABG"

Auger Bearing Gasket

PU-CB240-06 wiring chart

The PU-CB240-06 digital control board's wire connections are located in a row across the top of the printed circuit board.

Listed from left to right the following sequence should be followed.
Note:  White wires are "common" if applicable , if there are two black wires either can be connected to common.

1. Common for room air blower (shown in red below)

2. Hot for room air blower (shown in red below)

3. Hot for feed motor (shown in yellow below)

4. Common for feed motor (shown in black below)

5. Hot for exhaust blower (shown in orange below)

6. Common for exhaust blower (shown in orange below)

7. hot for igniter (shown in white/black outline below)

8. common for igniter (shown in white/black outline below)

Located at the bottom of the circuit board are the following connections;  the "J-2" connections are the connections for the vacuum shutdown switch (these wires do not matter which goes to what terminal). (shown in blue below)

The optional thermostat connection is located at the bottom right corner of the circuit board.

PU-CB04 Wiring Chart

The PU-CB04 digital control board's wire connections are located in a row across the top of the printed circuit board.

Listed from left to right the following sequence should be followed.
Note:  White wires are "common" if applicable , if there are two black wires either can be connected to common.

1. Common for room air blower (shown in red below)

2. Hot for room air blower (shown in red below)

3. Hot for top auger motor (shown in yellow below)
Note: in models which have 2 vacuum switches, the 3rd wire would connect to the "door ajar" vacuum switch and another wire from the vacuum switch would connect to the top auger motor.

4. Common for top auger motor (shown in black below)

5. Common for bottom auger motor (shown in violet below)
Note: this terminal is turned sideways and is located slightly below the line of terminals to accommodate the top mounting screw for the board.

6. Hot for bottom auger motor (shown in violet below)

7. Hot for exhaust blower (shown in orange below)

8. Common for exhaust blower (shown in orange below)

9. hot for igniter (shown in white/black outline below)

10. common for igniter (shown in white/black outline below)

Located at the bottom of the circuit board are the following connections;  the "J-2" connections are the connections for the vacuum shutdown switch (these wires do not matter which goes to what terminal). (shown in blue below)

The optional thermostat connection is located at the bottom right corner of the circuit board.

Click here for Downloadable Instruction Sheet

PU-CB98 Wiring Chart

The PU-CB98 digital control board's wire connections are located in a row across the top of the printed circuit board.

Listed from left to right the following sequence should be followed.
Note:  White wires are "common" if applicable , if there are two black wires either can be connected to common.

1. Common for room air blower (red on chart below)

2. Hot for room air blower (red on chart below)

3. Hot for top auger motor (green on chart below)
Note:  In models which have 2 vacuum switches, the 3rd wire would connect to the "door ajar" vacuum switch and another wire from the vacuum switch would connect to the top auger motor.

4. Common for top auger motor (green on chart below)

5. Common for bottom auger motor (violet on chart below)

6. Hot for bottom auger motor (violet on chart below)

7. Hot for exhaust blower (blue on chart below)

8. Common for exhaust blower (blue on chart below)

Located at the bottom of the circuit board are the following connections;  the "J-2" connections (shown in light blue in the chart below) are the connections for the vacuum shutdown switch (these wires do not matter which goes to what terminal).

The optional thermostat connection"J-3" is located at the bottom right corner of the circuit board.

The heat sensor is connected to the control board just below midway down and leads to the firewall of the stove (shown in purple in the chart below)

Click here for Downloadable Instruction Sheet

PU-CB93 Wiring Chart

The PU-CB93 analog control board's wire connections are located in a vertical row on the left side of the printed circuit board.

Listed from the top of the board , the following sequence should be followed.

Note: White wires are "common" if applicable , if there are two black wires either can be connected to common.

Colors listed below denote line color in chart not actual wire colors.

1. Common for exhaust blower (Blue)

2. Hot for exhaust blower (Blue)

3. Common for top auger motor (Green)

4. Hot for top auger motor (Green)

5. Common for bottom auger motor (Pink)

6. Hot for bottom auger motor (Pink)

7. Common for room air blower 1 (Red)

8. Hot for room air blower 1 (Red)

9. Common for room air blower 2 (Red)

10.Hot for room air blower 2 (Red)

11. Common for the power cord (Black)

12. Hot for power cord (Black)

Note: The thermostat connection is located at the bottom right corner of the control board.

 

Stove Shuts Off While Burning

Click here if the board shows an "E"

Click here if the board shows an "E-1"

If the unit shuts off completely while burning, without going through a shutdown procedure and does not show an "E" check first the power cord where plugged into the wall as well as the surge protector, if the surge protector has a pop out breaker check that as well.

If the unit has run for just 20 to 30 minutes and the "room air blower" has not started running ,check the "air on temp" setting by turning the unit on and pressing the air on temp button. after pressing the button, check the "blower speed" readout for the setting. This setting should show a "1" for approximately 5 seconds, it will then display the heat range and blower speed the stove was set at. if the setting is not a "1" when the air on temp button is pressed use the blower speed down button to quickly set it to "1" repeat the procedure if necessary until the "1" setting is displayed when the air on temp button is pressed. Then attempt to run the stove again.

If the air on temp setting is "1" and the room air blower did not come on, check the heat sensor for  a bad connection or a broken wire.

Parts Guide

Select your Model Number

 

25-PDVC,
55-SHP10,
55-SHP10L,
American Standard
or 55-TRP10
25-PDV(E),
55-SHP22,
55-TRP22,
or American Heritage
25-PDVP,
55-SHP15,
55-TRP15,
or US 25-5670
25-PI, 55-SHP20
or 55-TRP20
       25-PAF,        55-SHP25
or 55-TRP25

E-Codes

E. Vacuum Loss: Pellet stoves require a clean, unrestricted flow of combustion air to perform safely and efficiently. Vacuum loss can occur if any of the following circumstances exist:

  1. The exhaust setup should be done in such a way as to keep the horizontal length to a minimum, (See Installation Page) too long a horizontal run will slow the air flow down to a point where vacuum loss can occur. This is caused by a lack of natural convective rise in the horizontal section which means that the exhaust blower has to physically move this exhaust without the help of this natural rise. Two to three ft. of horizontal will generally work. As for the vertical portion of the installation; it is mandatory that the vertical must be at least 3' but it can be run higher. In this case, if the installation will require more than 15 ft of total pipe for the exhaust run, the pipe diameter should be increased to a 4" diameter at the 15 ft mark.

  2. The unit is designed to handle a standard through the wall pipe kit which contains two 90 degree elbows. One of which is a "clean out tee" which is placed at the bottom of the vertical stack to allow ease in cleaning of the flue pipe itself, and the other is generally placed at the top of the vertical to turn the flow of exhaust away from the structure if the flue is not being run above the roofline, before attaching the horizontal cap. Additional 90 degree elbows to this system can add resistance, or back pressure, to the flow of exhaust which could compromise the free flow of air needed for proper function. For "catty corner" installations an additional elbow is used. This elbow would be a 45 degree and would provide much less resistance; therefore addition of this piece would generally not compromise airflow.

  3. An Outside Intake Air source is Mandatory with all freestanding England's Stove Works' pellet units! As stated above, the free flow of air through these units is extremely important to ensure proper function. Virtually any structure into which a pellet stove would be installed will not have enough draftiness built into it to allow for the amount of air to leak back into the structure at the rate a pellet stove will remove it, the size of the structure is not a factor in this; therefore, a buildup of "negative pressure" will occur as air is removed from the structure. This buildup would then restrict the free flow of combustion air through the unit and will cause a loss of vacuum.  Improper installation of the outside air intake can also cause vacuum loss; the unit is designed to be connected to a 2" intake pipe which should be installed in as short and direct a manner as possible. This pipe would have to be less than 6 ft. in length and may not contain more than two 90 degree elbows. If these parameters cannot be met, the diameter of the intake must be increased to a 3" pipe for the entire length of the intake run. Most basement installations would have to be done in this manner. (See Basement Installation Page)

    The intake pipe should be equipped with a screen to keep any animals, bees or foreign material from getting into the intake, but the screen used should not be restrictive in its makeup, and should be installed above the snow drift line in areas where this could be a problem.

  4. Vacuum loss can occur at higher elevations due to the air being thinner, installations above 4,000 ft above sea level should be done using a 4" pellet vent pipe rather than 3" and intake should also be done in 3" in most cases.

  5. Failure to properly clean and maintain the unit can cause loss of vacuum to occur. Proper airflow will not be attained if the unit is not cleaned out regularly. Areas that must stay clear are:

    1. The firepot itself, especially the area under the wear plate, must not be allowed to become blocked. This area should be cleaned out at a minimum every few days or daily if the unit is being run on higher heat ranges.
       
    2. The impingement plate (or baffle plate) should be removed weekly and all areas behind it should be thoroughly cleaned.
       
    3. The heat exchangers, which can be accessed when baffle plate is removed, should also be thoroughly cleaned.
       
    4. The flue itself (the pellet vent pipe) should be cleaned monthly or after every ton of pellets (whichever comes first).
    5. The entire stove and flue system should be fully cleaned and serviced annually. Failures due to neglect in cleaning or maintenance will not be covered under warranty! It is recommended that an ash removal system be utilized to perform cleaning on these units, contact your hearth retailer or England's Stove Works to obtain such a system.   (See Cleaning Page)

  6. Other possible causes for "E" would include; non functional exhaust blower, a loose wire from the flue blockage vacuum switch to the control board (these wires connect to the control board near the bottom of the board), a loose hose connection from the flue blockage vacuum switch to the exhaust chamber, a blocked connection where the hose connects to the exhaust chamber, or, an improperly positioned baffle plate which would allow exhaust to bypass the top of the heat exchanger, i.e..  If the baffle plate is not positioned flat against the back wall of the firebox at the bottom allowing the fire to get behind it, (this would cause higher exhaust temperatures that could damage the vacuum hose or cause vacuum loss due to lack of air density (the hotter air gets the less dense it becomes, this makes it much harder to sustain vacuum pressure)).
  7. Using alternative fuels such as dried corn or cherry pits, which tend to feed faster, have different burning characteristics and Btu outputs. These fuels tend to burn hotter, and in the case of corn, the kernels burn slower than pellets do, so they can build up in the firepot and cause the fire to become hotter than it is supposed to.

Fuel Feed Related Problems

All England's stove works pellet units use a two auger feed system. This system feeds the fuel though at a rate determined by the control board settings. The upper auger located at the bottom of the hopper runs intermittently. The lower auger which brings the pellets from the upper auger to the fire runs continuously.

Each of the augers is independently run by a motor and gearbox assembly. These motors are identical and interchangeable. Feed related issues fall under two categories; bottom auger stopped, or bottom auger turning but no fuel is being fed.

Lower auger not turning

If the lower  auger is not turning the following should be checked:

  1. Is the auger physically jammed? Foreign objects such as wood chips or other objects that may have somehow gotten into the pellets.
  2. Is the motor getting power? If the motor is getting power it will get fairly hot quickly. If the motor is getting power but is not running and the auger is not jammed, the motor is bad. If the motor is not getting power, either the motor's wires or the control board are bad. Another possibility is if the electric motor is running but the auger is not turning, this could be a loose setscrew holding the motor to the auger, or a stripped gear in the gearbox. A stripped gear would mean the auger  motor must be replaced.

The lower auger is turning but no fuel is coming out

If this is the case, the first thing that should be done is the hopper should be emptied. Check the auger itself to see if it is physically jammed as foreign objects in pellets could jam the auger. If the auger is free the next step would be to determine if the motor is receiving power. The motor will get warm if it is getting power within a few minutes. If the motor is getting power and is not running the motor is bad. If it is not receiving power the next step is to check the wiring. the wires from the top auger motor are connected on terminals 3 and 4 on the control board from left to right).

Another possibility could be the over temperature limit protection in the control board. This will stop the top auger if the unit reads as being too hot, the auger will start moving again if the unit cools to an acceptable temperature however and generally will continue to operate.

(The vacuum switch to the left in this picture is wired through the top auger motor.)

Note: The model shown in the picture is the model 25-pdvc/55shp10/55trp10. In models 25-pdv/55-shp22 /55-trp22, and models 25-pi/ 55-shp20/ 55-trp20 the vacuum switch wired through the top auger circuit is located forward in the back of the stove beneath the room air blower.

Vacuum related stoppages

The "door ajar" vacuum switch present in newer model pellet units is wired through the top auger motor and works through vacuum pressure pulled from the firebox by means of a vacuum hose. If this hose is plugged disconnected, or damaged, the top auger will not run.


Useful Links

Wiring Page

Feed Rate/Thermostat Problems

Auger Alignment

No Room Air Blower

The room air blower in all England's stove works pellet units is controlled by the circuit board. this blower does not start until the unit has reached operating temperature. use the following steps to determine why the room air blower is not running.

1. Is there a fire in the unit? the unit must be at operating temperature to turn on the blower.

2. What is the "blower speed" set at?  The room air blower runs very slowly in its lowest settings and does not run at all in setting 0.

3. Does the stove shut off completely at 20-30 minutes from starting?  The circuit board's heat sensor must read enough temperature during startup to engage the "run" mode of the stove, if this temperature is not read by the sensor, not only will the room air blower not come on the stove will shut off.  If this is the case, check the heat sensor wires , make sure that the sensor is tight against the firewall and that it is plugged in to the control board.  If this is all correct replace the heat sensor (part number PU-CBHS ).

If the problem is not solved by using the steps above, remove the rear access panel, locate the blower and follow its wires back to the control board. unplug the two room air blower wires from the control board plug them into the terminals for another component such as the lower auger motor. and turn the unit on , the room air blower should start if the blower itself is good.  If the blower still does not start the blower should be replaced.

Downloadable Instruction Sheets

Dirty Burn

My Stove is Burning Dirty.
My Stove is Sooting.
My Exhaust is Smoking Heavily.

Possible Causes

  1. Bad pellets, wet or old pellets, pellets which have been wet will not burn as clean or as hot.  Try using a different bag of pellets especially if the ones being used are old, from a torn bag, or may have been stored in a damp environment. It is important to have dry storage for pellet fuel.

  2. Improper installation, lack of outside air source or using too long a pipe to bring in air will cause air deficiency. Too long a flue pipe, or too many elbows, intake or exhaust can also lead to a dirty burn.  Air flow is very important to get proper performance improper installation can cause resistance to the flow of air, causing fuel to burn dirty. Refer to installation manual for proper installation to compare your installation to. Click Here for Diagrams and Instructions for proper installation

  3. Leaky gaskets, door and window gaskets, as well as gasket behind burn box will decrease available air through the fire. To test for leaking door or window gaskets, turn the stove on without building a fire, close the door and take a lit match or lighter and move the flame around the edge of the window and around the door. If the gasket is leaking, the flame will be pulled toward the leak as air is sucked in past the gasket. Gasket should then be replaced. Click Here for Gasket Maintenance

  4. Overfeeding, if too much fuel is cycled into the burn chamber, there is insufficient air volume to give a complete, clean burn. A bag of pellets should normally last from 16 to 24 hours (smaller pellets tend to feed faster than longer ones) if the 40 lb. bag is not lasting that long contact customer service to have a technician walk you through a check of the programming of the control board.

  5. Insufficient combustion air, combustion blower is not running at sufficient speed. The exhaust blower should run at about 3000 rpm. Lubrication may help but replacement of the exhaust blower is the recommended course of action.

  6. Ash buildup in flue, if flue is not cleaned regularly ash buildup will restrict air volume being exhausted from stove. The flue system should be cleaned on a regular basis. We recommend it be cleaned at least once a month or once per ton of pellets used. Click Here for Cleaning Instructions

  7. Ash buildup in heat exchanger/firebox area, if firebox and heat exchanger are not cleaned regularly ash buildup will restrict airflow through the fire. The firebox must be cleaned on a regular basis and the holes in the firebox must be kept clear. The heat exchanger is located behind the impingement plate and should also be cleaned at least weekly.

  8. Leaving hopper lid open/unlatched, when hopper is not sealed down tight air can be pulled through the hopper and feed system reducing the amount of air through the fire. It is extremely important that the hopper lid be latched down tight while the stove is in operation. Airflow may occur through the auger system and in the event of a power failure or error shutdown smoke can travel back into the hopper if the lid is not sealed down tight!

  9. Wear plate missing, fire will burn dirty as air cannot get under the fuel and flow through it. The wear plate (or grate) must be present to allow airflow below the fire as well as to diffuse the air and spread it around the firebox to allow complete combustion.

  10. Loose bolts holding burn box, if bolts are loose air is allowed around the burn box rather than through it. On the front of the stove , below the ash lip there are bolts that hold the firebox in place and tight against the back of the burn chamber of the stove. This seal is important as the combustion air can leak around the firebox rather than go through it and the fire. Bolts should be tight enough to hold the firebox tight but do not over tighten them.

  11. Improper fuel, burning corn or cherry pits will cause a dirty burn because of the high ash, moisture and sugar content. The use of alternative fuel is possible when mixed with pellets but is not recommended. If the unit is burning dirty and these fuels have been used, clean the entire stove out thoroughly (flue system as well) and burn just premium hardwood pellets to see if the problem goes away. If using these fuels is still desired, adjust the mixture to use less corn or pits per bag of pellets.

  12. High altitude, air density at high altitude can cause dirty burn simply because of  the lack of available oxygen. In installations above 5,000 ft. above sea level the exhaust should be expanded to 4" pellet vent pipe (ac-3100 kit) and the outside air intake should be run with 3" pipe. Click Here for High Altitude Installations

No Combustion Air

If the unit is not burning the pellets at all or is not burning them as completely as it should , check the following.

1. Is the exhaust blower running?  This blower is responsible for both the exhaust and pulling combustion air through the fire.

2. Is the installation done to manufacturers specs? These units must have proper airflow through them in order to function properly, deviation from the manufacturers instructions for installation (including outside air intake) can cause problems with combustion airflow.

3. Has the stove/flue been cleaned? These units must be cleaned out according the the schedule in the manual. This would also include cleaning of the flue system. If the stove or the flue become loaded with excess ash, the blockage from this ash will generally cause poor performance from the unit.

4. Are the stove's gaskets serviceable?  Good gaskets are essential to good performance, leaky gaskets can change airflow through the stove causing burn related problems.

5. Is the stove being run with the hopper lid open? England's pellet units should NEVER be run with the hopper lid open or unlatched. the stove could pull air through the feed system. This not only will cause dirtier burning, it could cause "smoke back" during power failure if the unit is running.


Useful Links

Replacing Combustion Blower

Venting

Cleaning

Gasket Maintenance

Control Board Wiring

There are 8 different control boards which have been used on England's pellet units select the applicable control board for your unit.

  • The PU-CB93 was a knob controlled circuit board that was used on stoves built in 1997 and prior. (Click here for PU-CB93 wiring chart)

  • The PU-CB98 was used on all units built from 1998 through 2003 this is the "touchpad" control board used for stoves that do not have the "auto ignite" function. This board is also the replacement for the pu-cb93 board should it need to be replaced. (Click here for PU-CB98 wiring chart)

  • The PU-CB04 is the current version of control board used today in all England's pellet units. This board came into use in 2004 and is the control board used on all "auto ignite" versions of England's pellet units except the MAX/SUPER 240. (Click here for PU-CB04 wiring chart)

  • The PU-CB240-06 is the current version of control board used today in England's Max 240 pellet units. This board came into use in 2006 and is the control board used only on the England's MAX/SUPER 240 pellet units. (Click here for PU-CB240-06 wiring chart)

  • The PU-CBEP is the current version of control board used today in England's Evolution Pellet (EP) pellet units. This board is the control board used only on the England's 25-EP and 25-EPI pellet units. (Click here for PU-CBEP wiring chart)\

  • The PAH-CB09 is the current version of control board used in England's Pellet Auxiliary Heater (PAH) pellet units. This board is only used on the England's Pellet Auxiliary pellet units.  (Click here for PAH-CB09 wiring chart)

  • The CPM-CB07/CPM-CB07A is the current version of the duel control boards used in England's Multi-Fuel Stove. This duel-board configuration is only used on the England's CPM Multi-Fuel Stove.  (Click here for CPM-CB07 wiring chart)

  • The PU-CBIP is the current version of control board used in England's Imperial Pellet (IP) pellet units. This board is only used on the England's Imperial Pellet units.  (Click here for PU-CBIP wiring chart)

Electrical Troubleshooting

Blown Fuses

The unit has a 6 amp 125 volt fuse located on the control board which protects the unit from most power spikes

(Fuse Location)

England's stove works does strongly recommend the use of a surge protector with our pellet units as an added protection. Some spikes such as are caused by lightning strikes and the like may still cause damage to the board as they would to most any electrical appliance. An internal short could also cause a fuse to blow. In most cases a blown fuse from external spike would not cause damage to the unit. Should there have been damage to the electrical system the most likely symptoms would be;

1. Additional fuses blowing as soon as the unit is plugged back in.

2. Fuse blowing when on button is pushed.

3. A component running when stove is plugged in without turning the unit on (most common would be the room air blower, the cartridge heater, or the top auger motor. in some cases, provided the unit was not damaged but is not acting correctly the control board may be "rebooted" or reset back to its normal operating parameters, in this case normal function may be restored without replacing components.

Contact customer service at 800-245-6489 for instructions if needed to reboot the control board. A blown fuse from an internal short may be caused by a bare wire or a wire disconnecting from its terminal on a component and touching the hull or other metal component of the unit. For this reason, should a fuse be blown it is recommended that all wires should be inspected prior to replacement of the fuse.

Component Location

Faulty Motor/Blower

There are four electric motors in your pellet unit, each with a specific job. Two of these motors run continuously as soon as the unit is turned on (the exhaust blower and the bottom auger motor) the top auger motor comes on intermittently, and the room air blower comes on once the stove reaches temperature.

Checking auger motors

Follow these steps after determining the auger itself is not physically jammed. In newer units the upper auger motor is wired through a vacuum switch so the switch may be the cause for the motor not running. to check this motor without the switch, swap the wires at the motor from the lower auger motor to the upper and see if that set of wires run the motor , if they do the motor is good and likely the vac switch or the circuit board is bad.

Checking Room Air Blower

To test the function of the room air blower in stoves built prior to 2004 locate the wires for the room air blower and move them to the terminals for another component such as the bottom auger motor, and briefly turn the stove on, the room blower should come on immediately and run at its fastest speed. then turn the unit back off , unplug it and reinstall the wires back into their original configuration.

Checking Exhaust Blower

To check the exhaust blower, simply turn the unit on and check the blower (located on the left side of the unit) for function. Most newer units will give an "e-code" on the control board if this blower is not running.

Dry Run Functional Test

To check function, plug the stove in and switch it on. If there are no lights,   check the fuse located on the back of the circuit board.

If the stove does start running, the exhaust blower and the auger system should start immediately. The exhaust blower should be fairly quiet and should run up to speed rapidly.

The bottom auger (seen in the firebox) should turn continuously at 1 rpm. The top auger (seen in the bottom of the pellet hopper) should run and stop on a timed cycle; it should turn at the same speed as the bottom auger while turning.

The top auger will run for approx. 1 second on lowest heat range, up to approx. 6 seconds on highest heat range on a 16 second run/stop cycle. The room air blower will not run while stove is cold

The stove will run for 30 minutes in this manner. at the end of the 30 minute cycle, the unit will shut off. this is normal and concludes the "dry run"

 

    

                           (6 Amp Fuse)                                                            (Component Locations)

Shutdown Instructions

When the stove is running at temperature and the user wishes to turn it off, simply press the off button and  the unit will go through a "shutdown cycle".  The off light will illuminate and stay lit. The stove will perform the following functions while it shuts itself down. The upper auger will stop running to stop the flow of fuel. The exhaust blower, the lower auger, and the room air blower will continue to run. This is necessary to allow the stove to clear the feed system and cool itself down.

This process generally takes about 45 minutes to an hour depending on how hot the unit was when it was placed in shutdown. After the fuel is cleared from the lower auger and burned away, the fire will go out and the stove will cool down. The first component that shuts down during the cooling period is the room air blower.

After the unit has cooled to a temperature that satisfies the control board, the exhaust blower will shut off and the red "off" light will go out. at this time the stove should be safe to clean out ash and refuel to light back up if desired.

Control Board Settings

The Control Board  is a digital read-out board. This board offers a wide variety of settings to operate the unit. This part can be removed from the unit by loosening the two outside screws and pulling the board back to the inside of the stove. The rear access panel should be removed prior to removing the control board. A 5-amp "quick-blow" fuse is used on this Control Board.

NOTE: The bottom three control buttons are preset at the factory and should not require any changes. See "Operating Instructions" and "Daily Operation" section of the manual for instructions on other Control Board settings.

The heat range up and down buttons control the amount of fuel fed into the fire by controlling the length of time the top auger runs in each cycle. the blower speed up and down buttons control the speed of the room air blower.

(Control Board)

Go to Thermostat page

Lighting the Unit

Starting Up

(We strongly recommend a surge protector be used with our units).

Verify the hopper is clean and free of foreign matter and there is current at your outlet.  Fill the hopper with wood pellets; do not allow any part of the bag or any foreign material in the hopper, as this may jam the augers.  Ensure that all pellet matter is cleared from the hopper lid gasket. Close the hopper lid and secure the latches. Place a handful of pellets in the burn pot, spread a small amount of fire starter over the handful of pellets and ignite them. Wait a few minutes before closing the door and pressing the "ON" touch pad on the control board then, set the heat range and blower speed to 5 and 5 then wait 2 to 3 minutes before slowly closing the door.-- If the door is closed before the pellets are burning thoroughly, the exhaust blower could put out the fire.

If for some reason the unit does not come on after pressing the "ON" touch pad, the cord should be disconnected for two to three minutes. After this, the control board should reset and can be started again. If you still have problems, call our factory.

Never place gel on any hot surface or hot coals, and never use gasoline, lantern fuel, kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, diesel fuel or any other flammable liquid to start the fire!

Check to be sure the flame is sustaining itself and continues to increase. If the flame goes out, be sure the burn pot is cleaned out and free of hot coals before repeating the procedure

Approved Starter Materials for Pellet Stoves

Recommended fire starter materials: Wax-impregnated wood chips, cardboard cubes or liquid/gel  fire starter designed for pellet stoves.

Never use gasoline, lantern fuel, kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, diesel fuel, or any other flammable liquid to start a fire.

First Fire (Curing Out)

Note: The operation of this unit should be checked (dry run) prior to this procedure.

Go to Dry Run Instructions

Go to Settings

Adjust the "Heat Range" and "blower speed" to a "5" setting and allow the stove to burn in this manner for at least three (3) hours. This will allow the unit to "cure out" as the paint and the oils from the manufacturing process burn off. This process will generally produce an odor and in some cases a haziness in the room. We recommend you open doors and windows in your dwelling during this process.

Go to Shutdown Instructions

Subsequent Cold Starts: In a cold start situation, the unit should be operated at number "5" settings until the room air blower begins to operate.

Loading Fuel (Cold Stove)

Note: These units are designed to burn hardwood pellets. Use of other fuels is  not recommended.

When loading the unit, open the two hopper lid latches if the unit is a freestanding unit , if it is an insert , simply lift the hopper lid off and set aside.

Open the hopper lid, and pour in the desired amount of fuel. It is important that the hopper is not overfilled with fuel as the stove must be run with the hopper lid closed and latched.

After pouring in the pellets, ensure that no pellets or other matter is left on the gasket around the top of the hopper, then latch the lid down securely or in the case of the insert, place the lid back in position. At this point the if the unit is cleaned out it is ready for use.

Refilling the Hopper

Always press the "OFF" touch pad before refueling. This unit has a 40 to 60 lb. hopper, and should be refilled when the hopper level drops to three or four inches.


WARNING

Do not operate this unit with the hopper lid open or unsecured.

NEVER place your hand near the auger while the stove is operating.

Note: The hopper lid will be warm; therefore, you should always use some type of hand protection.  

Note: Always ensure that all pellet matter is cleared from the hopper lid gasket before closing. Be sure to close and latch hopper securely before re-firing.

Proceed to Lighting the Unit

Pellet Stove Service Procedures

Click on the links below to download printable instructions.

Thermostats

England's stove works pellet units can be operated using two types of thermostats. The function of the thermostat is to control heat in the structure the unit is located in. When running on a thermostat, the stove will run at the heat range setting selected on the control board until the temperature the thermostat is set for is reached. At this point the stove will revert to its "low burn function" which is essentially the same as heat range 1. The unit will run in this manner until the thermostat calls for heat again, at which time  the stove will revert back to running at the setting pre-selected on the control board.

The thermostat does NOT  turn the stove on and off on all models; see Owner's Manual.

REMOTE:  There is a Remote Thermostat available (Part # AC-3001) for your pellet unit.  It comes with everything necessary for quick installation, and has many features to allow remote control of your unit. The remote thermostat can be used on models that were manufactured through 2003 (there are exceptions, click the AC-3001 for info.).

                                                       

              (AC-3001 Remote Thermostat)                                   (PU-DTSTAT Wall Thermostat)

WALL: Also, an external wall thermostat (such as our Part # PU-DTSTAT) can be used on our pellet units as long as it is a 24-volt that works with millivolt systems. The unit will operate differently once the wall thermostat is connected - we recommend the Control Board be set at "9" on Heat Range and Blower Speed while using the thermostat. Refer to your Owner's Manual. Also refer to the section on "Start-up Procedure" for information on cold starts. The wall mounted thermostat can be used on all units.

Installation

After unplugging the unit, locate the jumper wire (J-3) on the bottom of the control panel. The two screws should then be loosened and the jumper wire removed from the board. Next, the two thermostat lead wires should be slipped into these openings and the screws tightened; the jumper wire should be saved for future operation without a thermostat.

Outside Air Intake

England's Stove Works recommends professional installation of our hearth products.

Outside air intake is mandatory for all England's stove works freestanding pellet units to overcome the effects of negative pressure inside of the structure it is being installed in.  Newer houses are especially prone to this due to better building technology,  but all homes no matter how drafty they seem are effected in this way.

(Outside Air Installation Diagram)

Since the early 1970's homebuilders have built houses in such a way as to make them more economical to heat and cool with electricity . This is done by making the house more airtight than was practiced in the past, this diminishes loss of heat through drafts and leaks in the home's structure, also, a lot of older homes have been renovated to gain efficiency as well. This tightly built construction can cause problems with combustion devices such as woodstoves and pellet stoves. more so with pellet units as a higher quantity of airflow is required for the unit to burn its fuel effectively. running a pellet stove using air pulled from inside the structure can lower the air pressure in the home in relation to the air pressure outside the structure, this is known as "negative pressure"

Negative pressure buildup inside a home reduces the unit's ability to receive the proper volume of air needed to effectively burn the fuel and drastically reduces the performance of the unit. The size of the structure does not matter in relation to negative pressure. Outside intake air defeats the buildup of negative pressure as the airflow comes from directly outside and is ejected back outside.

High Altitude Installation

England's Stove Works recommends professional installation of our hearth products.

NOTE: England's Stove Works strongly recommends installation of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors when installing ANY  type of stove.

If the unit is being installed at an altitude of 4000 ft above sea level or higher, the following amendments to the chosen installation should be made:

  1. The pellet vent pipe size should be increased to 4" (Part # AC-3100 Vent Kit) if choosing a "through the wall installation".  If connecting to an existing chimney use 4" pellet vent pipe.
  2. The outside air intake should be increased to 3".

Mobile Home Installation

England's Stove Works recommends professional installation of our hearth products.

NOTE: England's Stove Works strongly recommends installation of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors when installing ANY  type of stove.

England's Stove Works freestanding pellet units are approved for mobile home or doublewide installation with outside combustion air hook-up.  See "Flue System" section of manual. Mobile home installation should be in accordance with the Manufactured Home and Safety Standard (HUD), CFR 3280, Part 24.

WARNING: Do Not Install in Sleeping Room.

(Click here for Through the Wall Installation)

Secure the heater to the floor using the two holes in the pedestal.  If the unit is on a combustible surface, you will need to drill matching holes in the floor protection that you choose.

Do not disturb the structural integrity of the home, and be sure the unit is permanently electrically grounded to the chassis of your home.  Remember that outside combustion air is mandatory, and not to install the unit in a sleeping room of the home.

(Click here for Through the Roof Installions)

(Click here for Chimney Installations)

CAUTION: The structural integrity of the mobile home floor, wall and ceiling / roof must be maintained.

The England's  stove works pellet inserts are not mobile home rated.

Basement Installation

England's Stove Works recommends that basement installation be performed only by a professional installer.


NOTE: England's Stove Works strongly recommends installation of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors when installing ANY  type of stove.

For basement installations a 3 inch pipe and coupler must be used for Outside Combustion Air, and a minimum clearance of 3 ft. must be maintained from the ground to the pellet vent exhaust pipe and the outside intake air pipe.

This clearance is necessary to keep the intake and exhaust above the "snow drift line" and to provide clearance from any combustible materials such as leaves that may be blown under the exhaust opening.
 

(Typical Basement Installation Illustration)

What Type of Fuel is Best for Me and My Family?

-- If you are looking for that "perfect stove" to heat your home, you already know that the 'Alternative Fuel' options available to you are nearly endless.  And if you talk to stove manufacturers, local dealers or even your neighbors, you are likely to get varying opinions as to what type of stove - and fuel - will work best for your home (or workshop, or whatever you want to heat)...

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Government 2015-2016 Tax Credit

Good news! In an effort to reward homeowners that are choosing a cleaner form of energy to heat with, the president signed into law a credit for qualifying stoves. If you purchased one of our eligible stoves during 2015 or 2016, you qualify for a $300 dollar-for-dollar tax credit. Check out the eligible stove models and the requirements to receive this credit. Speak with your tax advisor about your specific needs, but you will need our Tax Credit Certificate as well as some other forms. Check the information below, including the HPBA link, which includes guidance on filling out IRS form 5695.

 

More information:

HPBA

Tax Credit Certificate

IRS Form 5695

Form 5695 Instructions


A Review by Derrick Riches on Our Smoke-N-Sear Pellet Grill

We were fortunate to have Derrick Riches (about.com) review our Smoke-N-Sear pellet grill.

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